Tag Archive | suffrage wagon

Patriotic protest theme important in women’s suffrage organizing!

Patriotic Protest theme of “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon! on Vimeo.

The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon will be on exhibit at the New York State Museum in Albany, NY during 2020.

The patriotic protest theme of the women’s suffrage movement constituted an important part of the wagon’s significance on its journey from New York City to Long Island in July of 1913. Edna Kearns, Irene Davison, and Serena Kearns wore colonial costumes and used banners citing “taxation without representation.”

The New York State Museum has a model of the Stanton/Anthony statue on exhibit until Women’s History Month in 2019. The actual statue will be unveiled during 2020 in Central Park. It will be the first statue of women in Central Park and an important feature of the national observance when US women will have been voting for 100 years.

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Check out LetsRockTheCradle.com, a public service for the media, policymakers, citizens, and organizations preparing for the 2020 national suffrage centennial.

Oklahoma is having 100th observance of women voting! More about 2020 centennial!

Support the permanent exhibition of the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon at the New York State Museum! on Vimeo.

SUPPORT THE NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM IN SPONSORING SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL PROGRAMMING AND EXHIBITIONS

Show support for the New York State Museum in Albany, New York putting the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon on permanent exhibit after the 2020 national suffrage centennial when American women will have been voting for 100 years.

IN OTHER NEWS ABOUT VOTES FOR WOMEN CENTENNIALS:

Oklahoma is observing 100 years of women voting during 2018. Part of the observance was encouraging citizens to vote.

GREAT IDEA TO PUT A 2020 CENTENNIAL MAGNET ON YOUR FRIDGE

Reminder: 2020 Centennial magnets and pins featuring the WVCI 2020 torch are now available at 2020centennial.org/shop. The image above shows how each appears on the presentation card. Pins are $2.50, 10 for $2.00 each, and 25+ for $1.75 each. Magnets are $3.00 each, 10 for $2.50 each, 25+ for $2.25 each. Thanks to the National Women’s History Project, a founding member of WVCI, for agreeing to manage the orders for WVCI!

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com by way of email, Twitter, and Facebook. Get ready for the women’s vote centennial. Some also call it the votes for women centennial. Or the 2020 women vote centennial. Whatever you call it, are you putting all your ducks in a row?

2020 Suffrage Centennial News, plus VIDEO!

Support the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon on permanent exhibit at NYS Museum! on Vimeo.

IN OTHER NEWS:

The Chicago City Council has renamed a historic downtown street after activist Ida B. Wells. Congress Parkway will be renamed Ida B. Wells Drive. Her descendants, friends, and supporters have been raising money to build a monument in her memory.

The Pomeroy Foundation has announced an expansion of the Historic Roadside Marker Grant Program. It is now open to all municipalities and 501.c3 organizations in New York State. The Pomeroy is also testing an expansion of the program on the national level. Stay tuned! As of March 2018, the Pomeroy Foundation has installed over 495 historic markers in 53 New York State counties.

The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Women’s History Affinity Group is developing a 2020 Suffrage Value Statement, with best practices and principles for the upcoming centennial commemoration of the 19th Amendment. The group is surveying the field for comments to help develop the statement. The deadline to submit comments is August 15, 2018. You can participate here.

We can’t keep up with all the celebrations and special programs scheduled across the US to commemorate August 26th, Women’s Equality Day. One example is the Miami-Dade County Commission for Women, The Women’s Park, and the League of Women Voters who will host their sixth annual commemoration for women’s equality on Saturday, August 25, 10-1, at The Women’s Park in Maimi, FL.

Author Kenneth Florey is appealing for help in the identification of this image. His entire special message was published in a feature on SuffrageWagon.org (August 1, 2018). Contact him at KennethFlorey at gmail.com

AND DON’T FORGET:

There’s a special bus tour of Washington, DC leaving from the Belmont-Paul national historic site (National Park Service) on August 26, 2018. The 1913 parade route will be featured, along with other sites of interest.

The Suffolk County Historical Society in Riverhead, NY (on Long Island, NY) continues its membership drive. The Historical Society has a lively program of exhibits and special programs. Part of the popular suffrage exhibition of Long Island activists is still on display.

Here at SuffrageCentennials.com we loved sending friends and interested folks over to the New York State Museum in Albany, NY to see the “Votes for Women” exhibit that went up in November 2017 and came down in May of 2018. The display was thrilling to see. The “Spirit of 1776″suffrage wagon was part of the exhibition. Now we are on to the next phase of planning for the national suffrage centennial in 2020 when it’s anticipated that the wagon will be on exhibit again.

The celebration of the 2020 national suffrage centennial has opportunities to get involved. And this doesn’t just involve sending money. The initiative for 2020 has relied, so far, on many volunteers to spread the word and organize others to carry out the work. There are opportunities to research and add to a database of first wave activists. Organizers are scouting for locations to erect historic markers to celebrate votes for women, an initiative of the National Votes for Women Trail. And there is more. Stay tuned!

Have you made plans yet for August 26th—Women’s Equality Day?

The “Spirit of 1776” wagon on its first grassroots organizing campaign in the summer of 1913. Photo courtesy of Rose Gschwendtner.

“Spirit of 1776”: 105 years ago suffrage wagon left NYC for grassroots organizing!

Morning news and updates about women’s suffrage and voting rights!! from on Vimeo.

The “Spirit of 1776” wagon reached Long Beach, NY on July 4,1913. Photo from the collection of Rose Gschwendtner, with thanks.

Reminder about New York Museum exhibit closing soon!

May 13, 2018 is the closing of the “Votes for Women”exhibit at the New York State Museum in Albany, New York. It will be your last chance to see the wagon on exhibit for now anyway. And the suffrage exhibit is terrific. For more information about the wagon: SuffrageWagon.org

Also, keep in mind that the honoring of Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr, continues with her centennial blog: InezMilholland.wordpress.com  Her centennial web site: InezMilhollandCentennial.com 

SuffrageCentennials.com continues publishing. Link up with us as the 2020 national suffrage centennial approaches in 2020. Follow by email, Twitter, and Facebook.

Happy Spring and a “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon reminder!

“Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon on exhibit until May 13, 2018 the New York State Museum on Vimeo.

You will also get to see the remarkable “Votes for Women” exhibit at the state museum. The “Spirit of 1776” wagon can be viewed in the lobby, not far from the exhibit. It’s worth a visit to Albany, New York. There is no word yet as to when it will be on display again.

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November 15th is the “Night of Terror” and first annual observance

The “Night of Terror” is one of the most sensational events of the suffrage movement in the United States. It’s featured in the HBO movie “Iron Jawed Angels” as one of the consequences of the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House in 1917. The “why” of the picketing isn’t as sensational as the “Night of Terror” itself. In essence, the picketing by the NWP was a last-ditch attempt in the minds of Alice Paul and associates that they needed to play hard ball with U.S. President Woodrow Wilson and his administration. Women in the larger movement didn’t all agree that it was a good idea. However, in retrospect the picketing became a “turning point” in the long and difficult campaign to gain voting rights. November 14-15, 1917 are the dates when the “Night of Terror” is observed. And 2014 is the first annual observance when Turning Point Suffragist Memorial and Suffrage Wagon News Channel collaborated to raise awareness of this pivotal event. Part of the observance included audio podcasts from Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom” 1920 book, an audio feature of Librivox. Follow the suffragist memorial project that will hopefully be funded and built by the time of the 2020 votes for women centennial in the United States. Subscribe to SuffrageCentennials.com by email or Twitter.

One hundred years ago, Elisabeth Freeman, Frieda Fligelman and Belle Winestine didn’t let grass grow under their feet

The web site SuffrageCentennials.com celebrates the exploding nature of information, research, stories and news about the suffrage movement that’s underway. An article about Jewish women from Montana who worked in the suffrage movement is well documented and illustrated in the excellent suffrage history series, “Women’s History Matters.” It’s a quality initiative, but more than that –the straight-forward accounts of grassroots women activists are enough to bring tears to the eyes of those fascinated about this under-reported slice of American history. An article, “The Lifelong Quest of Frieda Fliegelman and Belle Fligelman Winestine” recently published, is yet another example of a rich resource gathering momentum in the years leading up to the national 2020 suffrage centennial. Nevada and Montana currently are celebrating 100 years of their women as voters.

Suffragist Elisabeth Freeman is excellent example of someone we should call Great Aunt Elisabeth. Peg Johnston, Freeman’s great niece from Binghamton, NY, has produced a terrific web site about this energetic and courageous individual busy marching from New York City to Albany one hundred years ago. See centennial video for highlights. Freeman, who was born in England, had a long history of involvement in the English suffrage movement before devoting herself full-time to women’s rights and civil rights activism on this side of the Atlantic. A thorough and fascinating web site highlighting Freeman’s life and activism is available on an interactive web site and timeline for Elisabeth Freeman‘s life that provides an in-depth look at the wide range of actions and events that took place on the ground to support work in organizations on the local, state and national levels.

An excellent article in the Pasadena Weeky highlights some of Freeman’s other grassroots activism with a link to events in the present day that illustrates the interrelationship of issues, now and then. Freeman’s image often crops up in suffrage archives, and her career as an organizer is rich with examples of how women worked on the ground in order to build political power and recognition for their cause. Freeman’s use of a horse-drawn wagon for media events included work on Long Island, New York State, Ohio, and Massachusetts. See article in New York History.

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news about suffrage centennial events, programs, and related issues. Get ready for the 2020 votes for women centennial!

The story of how suffrage activists crashed the 1876 centennial on July 4th!

1876 National CentennialThere are some treasures in the national storytelling archives of our nation, and one of them is about how suffrage activists crashed the national centennial celebration in Philadelphia on July 4th in 1876. Check out the story in an audio file. It’s quite amazing.

Last year on July 1st the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon celebrated the centennial of its first journey on the road in 1913 with Edna Kearns, Serena Kearns, and Irene Davison. There’s an effort underway to get the old wagon out on the road again in 2017, and we’d like you to be involved. Just send an email to: suffragewagon at gmail.com and you’ll be brought up to date on how you can help. You can subscribe to Suffrage Wagon NewsChannel for regular campaign updates.

 

A suffrage centennial, here and there, opens doors!

Suffrage SoapboxWho says a suffrage centennial now and again doesn’t open doors? Not us. The UK is abuzz with news that UK performer Carey Mulligan has put everything aside to negotiate a role in “The Fury,” a feature film about the suffragette movement. It has been kicking around behind the scenes for a few years, and various suffrage centennials have rescued and brought the subject matter to the attention of the media biggies. The Votes for Women centennial, for example, kicked off this year with 100 years observance for Emily Davison with a documentary, plus all sorts of cultural and political events (including an opera). And now, there’s a suffragette sit com, “Up the Women,” that has been signed up for another season. We can’t see these programs, at least for now. But it certainly will stimulate the market when the wave of interest hits our shores. Meanwhile, Norway is having its suffrage centennial. See our coverage. Suffrage centennials are great, and even greater if they’re connected to what’s happening today. The Norwegian conference planned for November fits perfectly.