Ceremony on August 26, 2016 for Tennessee suffrage public art

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More than 95 years after Tennessee’s ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, public art celebrating this achievement will be unveiled during a ceremony on Women’s Equality Day, August 26, 2016, from 11 am to 1 pm. Alan LeQuire has created the sculpture that features five women involved in the final ratification battle in Nashville in August 1920. Tennessee Woman Suffrage Monument, Inc. commissioned the art and it will be prominently displayed in Centennial Park near The Parthenon.  “We are grateful to former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and current Mayor Megan Barry as well as the Metro Parks Department for their strong support,” said Paula F. Casey of Memphis, TWSM president. “Our volunteer statewide board is donating this $900,000 historically significant sculpture to Metro so that this history will be preserved.”

Artist LeQuire, who completed the bas relief in 1998 that hangs inside the state capitol as well as the Knoxville woman suffrage sculpture in 2006, said: “This is what I want to do with the rest of my career –memorialize these women.” The five women, who are honored in monumental bronze, participated in the final ratification battle in 1920: Anne Dallas Dudley of Nashville; Abby Crawford Milton of Chattanooga; J. Frankie Pierce of Nashville; Sue Shelton White of Jackson; and Carrie Chapman Catt, national suffrage leader who came to Tennessee to direct the pro-suffrage forces from the Hermitage Hotel.

The TWSM board members include Jacque Hillman of Jackson; Linda Knight, Esq., Nashville; Adrienne Pakis-Gillon, Vice-President, Germantown; Rosetta Miller-Perry, Nashville; The Hon. Patricia A. Pierce, Treasurer, Harriman; Alma Sanford, J.D., Nashville; The Hon. Janis Sontany, Nashville; and The Hon. Yvonne Wood, Secretary, Lebanon.Funds are still being raised. To learn more, go to tnsuffragemonument.org.

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“Seneca Falls” and “Suffrage” aren’t household words yet, but they may be soon enough!

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With the announcement of Hillary Clinton as the first woman to be a major party’s presidential candidate, there was loud cheering for the connection between the issues of the present day and the past. And especially loud cheering for the activists of the women’s suffrage movement. The word “suffrage” is coming into its own. It still has a long way to go in terms of mass recognition, but things have changed. Not long ago, mention of the word “suffrage” was guaranteed to make people’s eyes glaze over. That’s changing. About time! And the references to Seneca Falls, New York has brought that 1848 event located in upstate New York to the attention of millions of Americans. Keep the conversation ongoing. The year 2020 is the national centennial observance of women voting in the United States.

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“Stamping for Suffrage,” an Article by Kenneth Florey

Stamping for Suffrageby Kenneth Florey

Given past practice, it is highly likely that the US Postal Service will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the passage of the federal amendment granting women the right to vote in some fashion. Doubtless it will issue at least one postage stamp honoring “Votes for Women,” if not, more probably, a “souvenir sheet,” containing a variety of stamps picturing different elements of the movement.

In 1948, for example, the post office printed a stamp honoring the “one hundred years of progress of women” featuring images of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Carrie Chapman Catt. In 1970, the PO distributed an issue for the 50th anniversary of the suffrage amendment picturing a “votes for women” touring car that was so popular during the campaign. And in 1995, it honored the 75th anniversary with a very colorful design featuring a large group of suffragists in front of the Capitol Building. Its souvenir sheets celebrating the major events of the different decades of the 20th century included a stamp delineating a woman voting.

PAST HISTORY OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE HONORING SUFFRAGE ACTIVISTS

The Post Office has not neglected individual suffragists either. There have been stamps honoring Susan B. Anthony (twice), Lucy Stone, Elizabeth Blackwell, Abigail Adams, Dr. Mary Walker, Julia Ward Howe, Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, Belva Lockwood, and Alice Paul. Still yet to be pictured are such notables as Harriot Stanton Blatch, Anna Howard Shaw, and Inez Milholland, the suffrage martyr. Victoria Woodhull, the first woman ever to run for President (1872), has not been graced with a stamp either, although her period notoriety, particularly her stance on “free love,” could preclude her from ever appearing.

But again, I suspect that in 2020 we will see a souvenir sheet picturing either famous events from the suffrage movement or famous suffragists, perhaps a combination of both. The reason why I believe in the possibility of multiple stamps is that the PO in its current budget crisis has not been bashful in printing many different series to attract stamp collectors. If cartoon characters, famous chefs, baseball players, jazz musicians, Olympic athletes, early TV memories, and Gulf Coast lighthouses can be honored with multiple issues as they have been, surely the centennial celebration of women’s right to vote should attain at least equal if not greater recognition.

STAMPING FOR SUFFRAGE? THERE ARE SEVERAL POSSIBILITIES!

The Post Office welcomes ideas for stamps from citizens. If you have a suggestion about possible suffrage stamps, you can pass it along on the following official link: https://about.usps.com/who-we-are/csac/process.htm. Perhaps those of us who are interested could send in collective suggestions. One additional note: There are several sites, which can be found readily enough on the Internet, that will take photos and drawings that you submit and make them into stamps, complete with postage. These stamps are valid, and can be used in place of regular stamps. Prior to 1920, suffrage supporters made up their own postcards. Would it not be fitting in 2020 for people interested in women’s rights to print up their own stamps as well?

Check out Kenneth Florey’s website and his recently published book, “American Woman Suffrage Postcards: A Study and Catalog.” Image, courtesy of Kenneth Florey who will be speaking on May 28, 2016, 1 p.m., at the World Stamp Show and Exhibition at the Javits Center in New York City on May 28-June 4, 2016. Because of its size and scope, the show and exhibition is only scheduled every decade; the anticipated international attendance is  250,000.  The U.S. Postal Service will issue two stamps for this show.  The title of Florey’s presentation is “Philatelics, Postcards, and the Woman’s Suffrage Movement.” For more information. can be found at http://www.ny2016.org/Event.aspx?eventid=312

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2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative Created

The League of Women Voters of the U.S. (LWVUS) and the Sewall- Belmont House & Museum (SBHM), organizations with roots in the 72 year campaign for women’s  voting  rights has announced  the  creation  of  the  2020  Women’s  Vote  Centennial  Initiative   (WVCI), a collaboration commemorating the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment  which  added  women’s  right  to  vote  to  the  U.S.  Constitution.

 The WVCI will be led by a steering Committee and a larger task Force, which collectively represent  the  various  segments  of  the  historical  women’s  suffrage  movement,  contemporary women’s  organizations,  and  scholars. The list of members can be found sewallbelmont.org/learn/womens-vote-centennial

 The WVCI Steering Committee honored the convening of this initiative at a public program hosted by the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum and co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters on Wednesday, March 30, 2016.  The  program was entitled  “Women  and  Politics:   Advocacy,  Activism,  and  Influencing  Policy.”

The first project of the WVCI is a logo contest. The Initiative invites individuals and groups to contribute their design skills and creativity to the development of a logo and slogan (slogo) for use by anyone celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. The contest, which opens March 30th, will accept submissions through June 30th, 2016. A celebrity judge panel will help select  the  winner  in  time  for  an  announcement  on  Women’s  Equality  Day,  August 26, 2016. Details for the Slogo Contest and WVCI activities can be found at sewallbelmont.org/learn/womens-vote-centennial/.

Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative Task Force:

Miriam Bader, New York, Director, Education, Lower East Side Tenement Museum

Lucy Beard*, New Jersey; (Executive Director, Alice Paul Institute)

Robert P.J. Cooney, Jr.*, California
       Author, Winning the Vote: The Triumph of the American Woman Suffrage Movement
       Director, Woman Suffrage Media Project

Roberta Francis*, New Jersey
       Founding Chair, ERA Task Force, National Council of Women’s Organizations

Noemi Ghazala*, New York
       Superintendent, Women’s Rights National Historical Park, Seneca Falls

Lisa Kathleen Graddy*, Washington, D.C.
       Deputy Chair and Curator, Division of Political History
National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Lis Harper*, Houston
       Digital Consultant, Sewall-Belmont House & Museum

Page Harrington**, Washington, D.C.
       Executive Director, Sewall-Belmont House & Museum

Deborah L. Hughes, New York
       President & CEO, National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House

Jennifer Krafchik*, Washington, D.C.
       Deputy Director and Director of Strategic Initiatives, Sewall-Belmont House & Museum,

Barbara Irvine, New Jersey
       Founding President, Alice Paul Centennial Foundation, Inc.

Ida E. Jones, Ph.D., Maryland
       Archivist, Morgan State University

Marguerite Kearns, New Mexico
       Co-Chair, Inez Milholland Centennial Observance

Ann Lewis*, Maryland
       Co-Chair, President’s Commission on the Celebration of Women in American History, 1998-2000

Elizabeth Maurer, Virginia
       Director of Programs, National Women’s History Museum

Molly Murphy McGregor*, California
       Executive Director and Founder, National Women’s History Project

Denise D. Meringolo, Maryland
       Director of Public History, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Kathleen Pate, Arkansas
       Board Member, Arkansas Women’s History Institute

Sally Roesch Wagner, Ph.D., New York
       Founding Director, The Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation
Adjunct Faculty, The Renée Crown University Honors Program, Syracuse University

Judith Rosenbaum, Ph.D., Massachusetts
       Executive Director, Jewish Women’s Archive

Jennifer Scott, Illinois
       Jane Addams Hull-House Museum

Nancy Tate**, Washington, D.C.
       Immediate Past Executive Director, League of Women Voters of the United States

Marsha Weinstein, Kentucky
       Co-Founder and Vice President, Elizabeth Cady Stanton Trust
Board Member, National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites
Co-Chair, NCWHS’ National Votes for Women Trail Committee

Sydnee Winston*, Virginia
       Associate Producer, National Programming, WETA-TV

Pat Wirth, Virginia
       Executive Director, Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association

Jill Zahniser*, Minnesota
       Historian and Co-Author of Alice Paul: Claiming Power (2014)

*   Steering Committee member    **WVCI Co-Chairs

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TRAILER: Inez Milholland film coming in late April from filmmaker Martha Wheelock!

Watch the VideoThose interested in organizing special Inez Milholland programs will be able to launch their program initiatives with a new 15-minute film that will be available in late April 2016. Wild West Women and filmmaker Martha Wheelock are busy preparing for the release.  Here’s the trailer:

Inez Milholland is one of sixteen 2016 Honorees being recognized by the National Women’s History Project at a special Women’s History Month luncheon in Washington, DC. The noon event will be held at The Hamilton Live on March 19, 2016. For tickets, visit nwhp.org. For more information and photographs, visit InezMilhollandCentennial.com.

SuffrageCentennials.com is working to bring the story of Inez Milholland to American voters in this election year.

Visit the InezMilhollandCentennial.com web site for educational resources. Sign the digital petition supporting President Obama’s awarding of a presidential citizens’ medal in 2016.

GOODIES and resources with links. Plenty to support your programs.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

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