In 2020, let’s make Women’s Equality Day a national holiday!

Americans throughout the nation are joining the Women’s History Alliance in order to support Women’s Equality Day on August 26, 2020 being declared as a federal holiday.

Can we do this in four years? The planning for the 2020 suffrage centennial is already underway. This includes the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative (WVCI) that is looking toward programs and events throughout the nation. The National Collaborative of Women’s History Sites (NCWHS) is working to establish a Votes for Women Heritage Trail. It is on board, as is the National Women’s History Project with its 2016 theme, “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government” with a special 2016 Women’s Equality Day poster and a 2016 Women’s Equality Day PowerPoint presentation.

Sign up to become a state contact for the Women’s History Alliance by contacting Molly Murphy MacGregor at nwhp1980@gmail.com or
(707) 636-2888.

IN OTHER NEWS: A project to celebrate the 2017 women’s suffrage centennial in NYS. Dawn Scibilia, a filmmaker, is working on a documentary about political women in the twentieth century (1920, 1930, and 1940s). The crowd funding campaign to support “After the Vote” is about the many women who played influential political roles in twentieth-century New York City. Most Americans recognize the name of Eleanor Roosevelt but they may have little knowledge of the progressive public policies she advocated and helped achieve. Fewer still are aware of Frances Perkins, a key figure in achieving Social Security and the rights of labor unions. Hundreds of other women had similar policy goals and worked alongside Roosevelt and Perkins to win them. Contact: https://www.gofundme.com/Afterthevote

Convention Days are celebrated in July in Seneca Falls, New York each year. And while you’re in Seneca Falls, visit the women’s rights park.
Convention Days in Seneca Falls, NY

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Learn More

Get your free copy of film about Inez Milholland, America’s suffrage martyr!

Watch the Video

Wild West Women proudly announces the release and complimentary distribution of the film, “Inez Milholland ~ Forward into Light.” The trailer is shown here.

 This short documentary tells the story of American icon, Inez Milholland who broke convention with her striking conscience advocating for gender equality, pacifism, racial justice, unions and free speech in the early Twentieth Century. She became the voice of suffrage.

 In 1916 she crossed the country, giving 50 speeches in 28 days. Pushing through exhaustion and anemia she fell at the podium October 23,1916 at Los Angeles, Blanchard Hall.  She was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital where she died 30 days later. Her last public sentence, “President Wilson, how long must women wait for liberty?”

Run time: 15 minutes  Visit http://InezMilholland.org for ordering information.

Inspired by the Southern Poverty Law Center’s production and free distribution of “Selma,” filmmaker, Martha Wheelock made the decision to make a film about Inez Milholland,  the American suffragist who lost her life while campaigning across the West for federal suffrage.

 With the shockingly low numbers of Americans voting, Martha Wheellock wants women and girls to understand the cost and importance of the vote.  How better than tell the story of Inez Milholland, an astounding woman who gave her life for the 19th Amendment!

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Learn More

Ceremony on August 26, 2016 for Tennessee suffrage public art

Watch the Video

More than 95 years after Tennessee’s ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, public art celebrating this achievement will be unveiled during a ceremony on Women’s Equality Day, August 26, 2016, from 11 am to 1 pm. Alan LeQuire has created the sculpture that features five women involved in the final ratification battle in Nashville in August 1920. Tennessee Woman Suffrage Monument, Inc. commissioned the art and it will be prominently displayed in Centennial Park near The Parthenon.  “We are grateful to former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and current Mayor Megan Barry as well as the Metro Parks Department for their strong support,” said Paula F. Casey of Memphis, TWSM president. “Our volunteer statewide board is donating this $900,000 historically significant sculpture to Metro so that this history will be preserved.”

Artist LeQuire, who completed the bas relief in 1998 that hangs inside the state capitol as well as the Knoxville woman suffrage sculpture in 2006, said: “This is what I want to do with the rest of my career –memorialize these women.” The five women, who are honored in monumental bronze, participated in the final ratification battle in 1920: Anne Dallas Dudley of Nashville; Abby Crawford Milton of Chattanooga; J. Frankie Pierce of Nashville; Sue Shelton White of Jackson; and Carrie Chapman Catt, national suffrage leader who came to Tennessee to direct the pro-suffrage forces from the Hermitage Hotel.

The TWSM board members include Jacque Hillman of Jackson; Linda Knight, Esq., Nashville; Adrienne Pakis-Gillon, Vice-President, Germantown; Rosetta Miller-Perry, Nashville; The Hon. Patricia A. Pierce, Treasurer, Harriman; Alma Sanford, J.D., Nashville; The Hon. Janis Sontany, Nashville; and The Hon. Yvonne Wood, Secretary, Lebanon.Funds are still being raised. To learn more, go to tnsuffragemonument.org.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Learn More

“Seneca Falls” and “Suffrage” aren’t household words yet, but they may be soon enough!

Watch the Video

With the announcement of Hillary Clinton as the first woman to be a major party’s presidential candidate, there was loud cheering for the connection between the issues of the present day and the past. And especially loud cheering for the activists of the women’s suffrage movement. The word “suffrage” is coming into its own. It still has a long way to go in terms of mass recognition, but things have changed. Not long ago, mention of the word “suffrage” was guaranteed to make people’s eyes glaze over. That’s changing. About time! And the references to Seneca Falls, New York has brought that 1848 event located in upstate New York to the attention of millions of Americans. Keep the conversation ongoing. The year 2020 is the national centennial observance of women voting in the United States.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Learn More

“Stamping for Suffrage,” an Article by Kenneth Florey

Stamping for Suffrageby Kenneth Florey

Given past practice, it is highly likely that the US Postal Service will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the passage of the federal amendment granting women the right to vote in some fashion. Doubtless it will issue at least one postage stamp honoring “Votes for Women,” if not, more probably, a “souvenir sheet,” containing a variety of stamps picturing different elements of the movement.

In 1948, for example, the post office printed a stamp honoring the “one hundred years of progress of women” featuring images of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Carrie Chapman Catt. In 1970, the PO distributed an issue for the 50th anniversary of the suffrage amendment picturing a “votes for women” touring car that was so popular during the campaign. And in 1995, it honored the 75th anniversary with a very colorful design featuring a large group of suffragists in front of the Capitol Building. Its souvenir sheets celebrating the major events of the different decades of the 20th century included a stamp delineating a woman voting.

PAST HISTORY OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE HONORING SUFFRAGE ACTIVISTS

The Post Office has not neglected individual suffragists either. There have been stamps honoring Susan B. Anthony (twice), Lucy Stone, Elizabeth Blackwell, Abigail Adams, Dr. Mary Walker, Julia Ward Howe, Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, Belva Lockwood, and Alice Paul. Still yet to be pictured are such notables as Harriot Stanton Blatch, Anna Howard Shaw, and Inez Milholland, the suffrage martyr. Victoria Woodhull, the first woman ever to run for President (1872), has not been graced with a stamp either, although her period notoriety, particularly her stance on “free love,” could preclude her from ever appearing.

But again, I suspect that in 2020 we will see a souvenir sheet picturing either famous events from the suffrage movement or famous suffragists, perhaps a combination of both. The reason why I believe in the possibility of multiple stamps is that the PO in its current budget crisis has not been bashful in printing many different series to attract stamp collectors. If cartoon characters, famous chefs, baseball players, jazz musicians, Olympic athletes, early TV memories, and Gulf Coast lighthouses can be honored with multiple issues as they have been, surely the centennial celebration of women’s right to vote should attain at least equal if not greater recognition.

STAMPING FOR SUFFRAGE? THERE ARE SEVERAL POSSIBILITIES!

The Post Office welcomes ideas for stamps from citizens. If you have a suggestion about possible suffrage stamps, you can pass it along on the following official link: https://about.usps.com/who-we-are/csac/process.htm. Perhaps those of us who are interested could send in collective suggestions. One additional note: There are several sites, which can be found readily enough on the Internet, that will take photos and drawings that you submit and make them into stamps, complete with postage. These stamps are valid, and can be used in place of regular stamps. Prior to 1920, suffrage supporters made up their own postcards. Would it not be fitting in 2020 for people interested in women’s rights to print up their own stamps as well?

Check out Kenneth Florey’s website and his recently published book, “American Woman Suffrage Postcards: A Study and Catalog.” Image, courtesy of Kenneth Florey who will be speaking on May 28, 2016, 1 p.m., at the World Stamp Show and Exhibition at the Javits Center in New York City on May 28-June 4, 2016. Because of its size and scope, the show and exhibition is only scheduled every decade; the anticipated international attendance is  250,000.  The U.S. Postal Service will issue two stamps for this show.  The title of Florey’s presentation is “Philatelics, Postcards, and the Woman’s Suffrage Movement.” For more information. can be found at http://www.ny2016.org/Event.aspx?eventid=312

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Learn More