First Wave of the women’s rights movement—VIDEOS about descendants…

Report from the inside of the women’s rights first wave! on Vimeo.

SuffrageCentennials.com has syndicated news stories from Suffrage Wagon News Channel. We’ve been hearing reports about the millions of descendants of the first wave of women’s rights activists. They’re women and men and people from all sorts of backgrounds and interests. And this is the reason, in part, why the upcoming 2020 suffrage centennial has been getting so much attention. Interest and planning is ongoing across the nation.

IF YOU ARE WRITING ABOUT THE 2020 VOTES FOR WOMEN CENTENNIAL:

When the word speads even more about the 2020 votes for women centennial, more communicators will need quotations, guest blogs, interviews, and more. Marguerite Kearns is available. Call her at 505-300-1002 or visit the Cradle web site.

Marguerite Kearns and Olivia Twine took a blogging tour of the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the US during the fall of 2013. Now they’re transitioning the blog into a communications resource.

SuffrageCentennials.com is a partner in this project.

Make sure that you are in the loop. Sign up for Suffrage Centennial postings as they happen. The link to the form is on the home page of SuffrageCentennials.com

Suffrage Centennials is also on Twitter and email subscription.

This entry was posted on December 17, 2018, in Blog.

Wyoming celebrates 150 years of women voting!

On December 10, 1869, Wyoming territory passed the first law in United States history granting women the right to vote and hold public office – more than 50 years prior to the U.S. ratification of the 19th amendment. The State of Wyoming’s tourism office is focusing on this commemoration.

Since SuffrageCentennials.com is a clearing house for events and information, send us news of suffrage centennial events and points of view.

MAKE SURE YOU’RE GETTING READY FOR 2020

If you aren’t planning with your organization for a 2020 observance of the 100 years of American women voting—you should be.

What will you do personally, in terms of advocacy, to honor the past 100 years of women voting in the United States? Put this on the top of your “to do” list to think about during 2019. And then on January 1, 2019, make a resolve as to what you plan to do about it.

We’re all caught up with end of the year activities. Start thinking now about 2020 during 2019—and then 2023 when women in the US will have been working 100 years for an Equal Rights Amendment in the Constitution. Make an end of the year donation NOW and support your priorities!

IN OTHER NEWS ABOUT SUFFRAGE CENTENNIALS:

Enter the conversation. Send us your events and thoughts about planning for 2020.

The Minnesota Historical Society is working with its partner, the League of Women Voters, to celebrate 2020. Are you following the campaign to honor Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr, from now to 2020?

Plan a trip to the New York State Museum that is putting the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon on exhibit during 2020 and part of the rotating permanent exhibit!

Support Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in opening its doors in 2020 to celebrate the national suffrage centennial!

Don’t forget the fundraising appeal for the restoration of the Farmington, NY Quaker Meeting House that sponsored many historic events. 

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com

LetsRockTheCradle.com is a public service for writers, editors, educators, bloggers, newsletter editors, and many others who are interested in spreading the word about the 2020 centennial celebration in the United States when women will have been voting for 100 years.

 

Suffrage Centennials in other places, like the UK!

December 12, 2018 marks 100 years since women first voted in a general election in the UK. Sara at HistoricNewspapers in the UK reached out to tell us about their new timeline and chart that puts a perspective on a selection of countries and how long it took to grant voting rights.

Elizabeth Crawford in the UK has been blogging over the past few years as she has in her possession valuable primary documents from the votes for women movement. She says in a recent posting:

Suffrage Stories: The First Women General Election Candidates, 1918: Winifred Carney

by womanandhersphere

21 November 2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the passing of the Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act, by which women were for the first time able to stand for election as members of Parliament.

It was only earlier in the year, on 6 February, that some women (over 30 and fulfilling a small property qualification) had at long last been granted the parliamentary vote and now, as the Great War had come to an end, women actually had the prospect of sitting in the House of Commons.

Crawford’s recent posting is about 1918 when women took advantage of the opening by running for office. Her work is fascinating and well worth following. Crawford purchases suffrage materials and memorabilia.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Happy Holidays from your friends celebrating suffrage centennials!

Holiday greetings from your suffrage centennial friends! on Vimeo.

Happy holidays through the New Year from your suffrage centennial friends!

Statue projects commemorating Votes for Women activists are expensive. There are statues popping up all over the US, including statues of Sojourner Truth and Rosalie Jones planned by the State of New York; the statue of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in NYC’s Central Park; statues of Tennessee’s suffrage activists involved in the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution; and more.

A statue project to honor Emily Davison, the UK’s suffrage martyr, is underway. Davison died on June 8, 1913. emilydavisonmemorialproject.wordpress.com

No statue exists or is planned to honor Inez Milholland, the US suffrage martyr, who died in 1916 in California.

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com on the blog, by email, Twitter, and Facebook!

Advertise in the Gazette in 2019 for the national suffrage centennial!

Votes for Women news to prepare for 2020 suffrage centennial on Vimeo.

CONSIDER ADVERTISING FOR THE 2020 VOTES FOR WOMEN CENTENNIAL!

Consider advertising your event, celebration, etc. in the National Women’s History Project’s Gazette, “How Women Won the Votes.” It is chock full of information, resources, memorabilia, books, and much more.

SuffrageCentennials.com has been publishing since 2013. Visit Suffrage Wagon News Channel for news and views about the first wave of the women’s rights movement in the US. LetsRockTheCradle.com provides updates about action campaigns.

KEEP INEZ MILHOLLAND IN THE NEWS FOR 2020

Keep Inez Milholland’s memory in the public domain. In 2016 Marguerite Kearns and Bob Cooney coordinated the centennial of Milholland’s death. Refresh your memory at InezMilhollandCentennial.com

Follow InezMilholland.wordpress.com, a site that has been publishing since 2016 for the 100 anniversary of Milholland’s death, a commemoration sponsored by the Women’s History Alliance, formerly the National Women’s History Project.

IN OTHER NEWS FOR 2020 CENTENNIAL: One of the many events and celebrations coming up over the holidays!

LetsRockTheCradle.com is a public service for media inquiries about the 2020 votes for women centennial.

SuffrageCentennials.com gives an overview of events and celebrations.

 

Get ready for 2019 by subscribing to the Suffrage Centennials quarterly newsletter!

Dear Friends,

We’re getting ready to celebrate the 2020 centennial observance of US women voting for 100 years.

You may also be on the trail of following the upcoming 2020 suffrage centennial because you’re a votes for women, first wave women’s rights descendant. And you also might be in yet another category of being a descendant and not know it yet. Scratch the surface of your family history and you may be surprised.

There are millions of us. Chances are—you haven’t yet realized your essential role in US history. During 2020, our job is to celebrate 100 years of voting rights and put this into play by insisting on remembering our nation’s democratic roots.

Tens of thousands of women and their allies spent decades working for the right to vote from 1848 (and before) through 1920. They have descendants, and you, like many others, haven’t yet dug into this part of your family history.

That you may be descended from the first wave of American voting rights activists shouldn’t be passed over lightly. Many family members didn’t mention this important association and organizing priority in their lives to their children, grandchildren, great grandchildren, and other descendants.

Are there interests you have and activities that you’ve not mentioned to friends and family members? Of course.

Even if you can’t prove a direct family connection, the first wave of the women’s rights movement in the United States is an important and essential part of our national legacy and history…whether you’re a young person, woman, man, or wherever you find yourself on the gender continuum.

The chances are excellent that you are descended, either directly or by interest, to the tens of thousands of voting rights activists and their allies who worked and sweated for decades to win the right to vote during the first wave of the women’s rights movement. If you aren’t directly related, you may be a descendent in some other way—spiritual or because of your interests and concerns.

There are many citizens who define themselves as first wave women’s rights descendants simply because they are passionate about this earlier part of American history. By combining the accomplishments of ALL the waves of rights activists through today, we find ourselves standing on strong shoulders.

Our place in history will be celebrated during 2020, and we want to make sure you’re part of this turning point in time.

Sign up to receive the Suffrage Centennials quarterly newsletter. You can also choose to benefit from weekly posts from SuffrageCentennials.com by adding your email to the form on the SuffrageCentennials.com web page.

Celebrate women’s freedom to vote during 2020. That’s why you’re being contacted now. So we’ll be ready by 2020 to be heard, loud and clear.

There is no cost…only benefits. _

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Inez Milholland books are a great gift idea!

You’ll be doing your part by getting prepared for the 2020 national centennial observance by purchasing Remembering Inez: The Last Campaign of Inez Milholland, Suffrage Martyr by Robert P.J. Cooney, Jr. Remembering Inez presents images and primary documents associated with Milholland’s life and times that haven’t been in general circulation before this.

November 2018 was the publication date for a new book with Inez Milholland on the cover: “Bold and brave: Ten Heroes who won women the right to vote” by Kirsten Gillibrand and Maira Kalman.

The Cooney book highlights impressive photography of the period and what Inez Milholland’s contemporaries had to say about her. Robert P.J. Cooney, Jr.  is the author of Winning the Vote: The Triumph of the American Woman Suffrage Movement , a classic work that details the many campaigns involved with winning votes for women before 1920. Winning the Vote was produced in conjunction with the National Women’s History Project. It’s a basic reference book worth owning, loaded with images that will keep you fascinated from page one to the end, and it’s a hefty tome indeed that anyone interested in the suffrage movement shouldn’t be without.

If you order through the National Women’s History Project, you’ll be supporting a terrific organization with more than 40 years advocating for writing women into history. Remembering Inez is an essential and important work to add to any suffrage movement library. Order the book now at the specially dedicated web site: RememberingInez.com

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NEWS about federal women’s suffrage commission! Plus grant for National Women’s Hall of Fame…

US WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION NEWS!

We’ve been advocating for celebrating the 100th anniversary of women voting in 2020 since we took a blogging tour of the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the US. The number of planned events for 2020 and the 100th anniversary of womens’ right to vote will make a leap on December 7, 2018 with a meeting in Washington, DC. at the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, 144 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002; in the Allender Gallery on the 2nd floor.

For more information, contact Kim Oliver, Designated Federal Officer, Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, 1849 C Street, NW, Room 7313, Washington, DC 20240; phone: (202) 912-7510; fax: (202) 219-2100; email: kmoliver@blm.gov.

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT THE FEDERAL WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION?

The US Congress passed legislation to create the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission Act, a bill, “to ensure a suitable observance of the centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment of the Constitution of the United States providing for women’s suffrage.”

The duties of the Commission, as written in the law, include: (1) To encourage, plan, develop, and execute programs, projects, and activities to commemorate the centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment; (2) To encourage private organizations and State and local Governments to organize and participate in activities commemorating the centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment; (3) To facilitate and coordinate activities throughout the United States relating to the centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment; (4) To serve as a clearinghouse for the collection and dissemination of information about events and plans for the centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment; and (5) To develop recommendations for Congress and the President for commemorating the centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment.

PROGRAM ABOUT INEZ MILHOLLAND AT SUSAN B. ANTHONY MUSEUM & HOUSE plus news about National Women’s Hall of Fame

Sandra Weber will present a program about Inez Milholland at the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House in Rochester, New York on December 3, 2018. It is part of the museum and house lecture series in its 16th year. Milholland is the US suffrage martyr.

The National Women’s Hall of Fame is celebrating 50 years in operation in Seneca Falls, NY. Their good news has to do with reaching the level of funding desired so the organization can move to the historic Seneca knitting mill, an 1844 landmark.

A BLAST FROM THE PAST:

On Christmas day in 1916, women from all over the nation gathered in Washington, DC for a memorial service honoring Inez Milholland. They called her their suffrage martyr. Doris Stevens in her 1920 book, “Jailed for Freedom,” honored Inez in this selection from her book published by Librivox and edited by Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

In 2016, the National Women’s History Project honored Inez in a year-long observance chaired by Marguerite Kearns and Robert P.J. Cooney Jr. Martha Wheelock and Wild West Women produced a 15-minute film distributed to thousands of individuals, organizations, and schools throughout the nation. Suffrage Centennials was a partner in this centennial observance.

AUDIO ABOUT INEZ MILHOLLAND: FROM “JAILED FOR FREEDOM”

Visit InezMilholland.wordpress.com for updates about Inez Milholland and the 2020 centennial observance of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.

We are supporting all efforts to remember Inez during 2020, the nation’s suffrage centennial when American women will have been voting for 100 years.

suffragecentennials.com works hand in hand with LetsRockTheCradle.com, a public service working with communicators spreading the word about the 2020 centennial for women’s voting rights.

STAY IN TOUCH WITH LETSROCKTHECRADLE.COM—

Refer writers and editors, bloggers, communicators, educators, and others to the Cradle site so that the women’s suffrage centennial gets the coverage it needs. It’s the 100th anniversary of women voting in 2020 with the celebrations of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution that commemorates the anniversary of women’s right to vote.

Our Special Wishes for Santa in 2018 from Suffrage Centennials!

Our special wish for Christmas—Ask Santa to put in a good word at the New York State Museum! on Vimeo.

WE PUT IN REQUESTS FOR TURNING POINT SUFFRAGIST MEMORIAL AND THE NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM

When whispering in Santa’s ear this year, tell him we’d love the “Spirit of 1776” wagon being put on permanent exhibit at the New York State Museum in Albany, New York. We would love to see the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial open by 2020. Have you sent a donation yet?

See if there is any weight he and Mrs. Claus can pull in the direction of getting the Equal Rights Amendment passed before 2023. Yes, that’s right. American women will have been working for equal rights in the U.S. Constitution for 100 years  by 2023. Are we going to let this deadline pass? Put ERA support on your “to do” list for 2019.

SPREAD THE WORD ABOUT THE NATIONAL VOTES FOR WOMEN TRAIL

And spread the word about the fundraising campaign to build a database for the national votes for women trail. Here’s a video to lay out the particulars.

National Votes for Women Trail – GoFundMe from NCWHS on Vimeo.

Does it feel right celebrating women’s freedom to vote if the election process is manipulated, if voters are denied access to this essential right? We can’t isolate these concerns from the celebrations. If we can’t, we owe our grandmothers and activist ancestors an explanation.

MAKE THE ELECTORAL SYSTEM HONEST AND FREE 

Have a productive New Year!

Blasts from the past—Long Island and its spies! PLUS suffrage centennial news!

TURN: Washington’s Spies shows Long Island in 1777 and Suffrage Wagon Cafe program shows what happened 100+ years later on Vimeo.

REFLECTING ON TV SPECIAL ABOUT GEORGE WASHINGTON AND HIS SPIES

The TV special about George Washington’s spies in 2015 didn’t come and go without folks paying attention. There’s a connection between Long Island, the colonial spy network there, and the women’s suffrage movement. We also refer to the latter as the first wave of women’s rights activism in the nation.

An excellent article appeared on The New York History Blog (John Warren, editor) that gives more fascinating background on this part of our past. “Long Island’s Austin Roe: American Spy” by Michael DeBonis fills in more of the picture.

ROSALIE JONES AND THE ROAD MARKER INSTALLATION IN HUNTINGTON, NY

And it’s a woman, Rosalie Jones, a Long Island suffrage activist 100+ years later that demonstrates how the British occupation of New York City and Long Island still resonated with living memory of this past. The installation of a marker in the town of Huntington, NY in April 2018 is another reminder of this period of American history when the conflict over independence from England was still up in the air.

See article written by Huntington’s town historian, Robert Hughes.

WHO WAS ROSALIE JONES ANYWAY?

Rosalie Jones was high profile first wave activist from Long Island.

Rosalie Jones: A high-profile Long Island Suffragist on Vimeo.

HOW THE “SPIRIT OF 1776” SUFFRAGE WAGON MADE HISTORY

The incident involving Rosalie Jones, her mother Mary Jones, and Edna Kearns was commemorated in April of 2018 by the installation of a historic marker on the main street of Huntington, NY.

Unveiling of “Spirit of 1776” heritage road marker in Huntington, NY on Vimeo.

UPDATE ABOUT AUGUST 26TH AND A POSSIBLE FEDERAL HOLIDAY

What did you plan for August 26th—Women’s Equality Day—this year? We’re supporting the building a base of support, in people’s homes and communities across the nation to make the date a federal holiday. There’s a growing audience to hear about opportunities to get together, share food, and passions. The National Women’s History Project has been working for over 40 years to write women into American history. This is part of the continuing effort. And making August 26th into a holiday is a priority of the National Women’s History Project, an organization now known as the National Women’s History Alliance.

KEEPING THE STORY OF INEZ MILHOLLAND BEFORE THE PUBLIC

The NWHP sponsored a centennial observance of the death of Inez Milholland in 1916. The centennial blog of this effort is still broadcasting the news. Stop by and say hello: InezMilholland.wordpress.com

And find out about the terrific 15-minute film, “Forward into Light,” that is perfect to view for your organization’s events for August 26th and all during 2020, an election year and centennial of US women voting. It’s a terrific introduction to the country’s suffrage martyr. Find out more at: InezMilholland.org

REMINDER FROM THE NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM IN ALBANY, NY

The New York State Museum in Albany, NY will exhibit the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon used by Edna Kearns (resident of Long Island and NYC) and others in organizing for women’s voting rights. Are you planning a trip in 2020? There’s a lot being planned NOW.

VOTES FOR WOMEN CENTENNIAL INFORMATION RESOURCES

Here at Suffrage Centennials, we carry on. New York State is the “cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States. If you didn’t already visit the cradle in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, make plans for 2019 and 2020, the national suffrage centennial.

And visit our sister sites—Suffrage Wagon News Channel and LetsRockTheCradle.com

Get ready for 2020, the observance of 100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution when the nation’s women will have been voting for 100 years.