Tag Archive | suffrage centennial

One Result of the Corona Virus around the World! From SuffrageCentennials.com

CONCERN ABOUT THE RISE IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DUE TO PANDEMIC

The European Union is only one of the international forums concerned about the rise of domestic violence resulting from the lockdowns of areas around the world due to the virus pandemic. This isn’t new. Health crises have in the past led to domestic violence and this is no exception.

This is a video produced by the international movement associated with Eve Ensler (vday.org) that has been responding to this trend during so-called “normal times” that has been made even more alarming now. Here is musical and video commentary:

IF YOU WANT TO ADD SPICE TO YOUR ORGANIZATION’S PROGRAMMING…

Consider focusing a program on Inez Milholland, the US suffrage martyr. It may have to be a virtual event. If so, it’s a trial run to learn what it takes to function online during these troubled times. Planning may have to take mobility issues into consideration because of the many closings during the coronavirus emergency.

CONSIDER A RANGE OF POSSIBILITIES

If you are able to plan a “live” event sometime this year, you can quickly pull together an excellent 15-minute film about Inez, and add a copy of the Gazette, a tabloid and handout on 2020 suffrage events and special celebrations, to your guests’ resources. The Gazette is published by the Women’s History Alliance (see their web shop for details). There’s music by Earth Mama and many other performers.

Another possibility is a virtual event, gallery, or exhibition.

U.S. Women—in the final push for equality! on Vimeo.

In late 2019, Mt. Discovery was renamed Mt. Inez, in honor of Inez Milholland, the US suffrage martyr from upstate New York. The town of Lewis, NY and its residents are proud of the road markers erected locally, funded by the Pomeroy Foundation, to mark and locate Milholland’s grave and related locations. The Milholland family lived in Lewis, NY for many decades. And the town has been the site of many events over the years to commemorate Inez.

There’s a terrific 15-minute film about Inez, perfect for 2020 observances and for the general public. And the renaming of Mt. Discovery in the Adirondack Mountain region of New York State is a milestone in the work conducted over the past decade to bring the stories about US suffrage activists to the attention of the public. Stay in touch with the many opportunities during 2020 to bring the story of the history of the US women’s rights movement to the attention of the broader public.

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Stay up to date with news about Inez on the centennial blog, InezMilhollandCentennial.com

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel for news and views.

Votes for Women news to prepare for 2020 suffrage centennial on Vimeo.

The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon was put on exhibit at the New York State Museum in Albany, New York in early March of 2020. It was scheduled to be there until the end of the summer of 2020. As of this date, the New York State Museum is closed temporarily. Find out about the wagon’s future exhibition at SuffrageWagon.org

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Suffrage Wagon News Channel has been publishing since 2009.

“Stamping for Suffrage,” What Kenneth Florey Predicted!

THE SUFFRAGE STAMP PUBLISHED BY THE US POSTAL SERVICE FOR 2020…

Kenneth Florey is the author of books on suffrage memorabilia. Ken has written for Suffrage Wagon News Channel in the past about the importance of the US Postal Service in recognizing the centennial of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution in some way. In his columns, Florey urged the US Postal Service to publish and distribute a suffrage centennial series. As Ken also predicted, the national postal service could also issue a single stamp. That’s what happened. Below: Examples of past stamps.

US postage

KEN FLOREY’S PAST PREDICTIONS ABOUT A SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL STAMP!

by Kenneth Florey

Given past practice, it is highly likely that the US Postal Service will commemorate the 2020 centennial anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote. Doubtless it will issue at least one postage stamp honoring “Votes for Women,” if not, more probably, a “souvenir sheet,” containing a variety of stamps picturing different elements of the movement.

In 1948, for example, the postal service printed a stamp honoring the “one hundred years of progress of women” featuring images of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Carrie Chapman Catt. In 1970, the PO distributed an issue for the 50th anniversary of the suffrage amendment picturing a “votes for women” touring car that was so popular during the campaign, and, in 1995, it honored the 75th anniversary with a colorful design featuring a large group of suffragists in front of the Capitol Building. The souvenir sheets celebrating the major events of the different decades of the 20th century included a stamp delineating a woman voting.

The postal service has not neglected individual suffragists either. There have been stamps honoring Susan B. Anthony (twice), Lucy Stone, Elizabeth Blackwell, Abigail Adams, Dr. Mary Walker, Julia Ward Howe, Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, Belva Lockwood, and Alice Paul. Still yet to be pictured are such notables as Harriot Stanton Blatch, Anna Howard Shaw, and Inez Milholland, the suffrage martyr. Victoria Woodhull, the first woman ever to run for President (1872), has not been graced with a stamp either, although her period notoriety, particularly her stance on “free love,” could preclude her from ever appearing.

… The reason why I believe in the possibility of multiple stamps is that the PO in its current budget crisis has not been bashful in printing many different series to attract stamp collectors. If cartoon characters, famous chefs, baseball players, jazz musicians, Olympic athletes, early TV memories, and Gulf Coast lighthouses can be honored with multiple issues as they have been, surely the centennial celebration of women’s right to vote should attain at least equal if  not greater recognition.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Women’s History Month gifts and celebrations lead up to 2020 suffrage centennial!

Across the nation special community and school events are planned during Women’s History Month. Classroom teachers have been scheduling learning opportunities. Special posters, balloons, books, and party favors are available through web sites at historic sites and organizational gift shops.

Zoe Nicholson, for example, is busy during March of 2019 presenting programs about suffrage activist Alice Paul. Check out Zoe’s web site at missalicepaul.com

For example, some of Zoe’s programming…

imagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your 2020 suffrage centennial event.

The Tale of the Fourth of July Co-conspirators for your suffrage centennial event!

Declaration_

Gather your friends around and help them picture the scene. Susan B. Anthony is ready to move in with Matilda Joslyn Gage, Sara Andrews Spencer, Lillie Devereau Blake, and Phoebe W. Couzins to crash the July 4th, 1876 centennial event in Philadelphia. The platform is filled with dignitaries and the co-conspirators wait until after the reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Here is what happened: Anthony marched up to the platform filled with centennial officials. She formally presented the Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States, an update on the declaration from back in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York.

The document sent the message that the nation must not turn its back on the unfinished American Revolution by denying women equality and the right to vote.

After delivering the proclamation, Anthony and others distributed copies to the crowd and left the centennial hall. THE RESULT: Pandemonium. General Howley, chairman, shouted for order to be restored.

THE OUTCOME: Suffrage activists held their own independence celebration in Philadelphia.

HOLD YOUR OWN CELEBRATION THIS YEAR AS YOU PLAN FOR THE 2020 NATIONAL CENTENNIAL OBSERVATION OF VOTES FOR WOMEN.

IN 2020, AMERICAN WOMEN WILL HAVE BEEN VOTING FOR 100 YEARS.

The July 4th Co-conspirators

AUDIO ACCOUNT OF WHAT HAPPENED on July 4, 1876 at the Fourth of July national centennial, as told by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in her memoir, Eighty Years and More. Read by Amelia Bowen for Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

NOW, LET’S FIRE UP THE BARBEQUE GRILL in 2018 and have fun!
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What’s all the fuss over Inez Milholland during women’s suffrage centennials?

Inez Milholland
WHO WAS INEZ MILHOLLAND? 
WHAT’S A QUICK WAY TO UNDERSTAND WHY INEZ MILHOLLAND (1888-1916) HAD SUCH AN IMPACT ON THE PEOPLE OF HER TIME?
 —————————————————
INEZ MILHOLLAND (1886-1916) is the United States suffrage martyr. Inez gave her life while campaigning for the right of American women to vote. We honor because Inez represents the tens of thousands of activists like her, both leaders and grassroots organizers, who dedicated themselves to winning women’s voting rights from 1848 to 1920.
You may have seen photos of Inez on a horse leading the big women’s suffrage parade in Washington, DC in 1913. But you may not have connected this to the fact that Inez became the U.S. suffrage martyr three years later. Inez collapsed on a lecture platform while on the campaign trail in November 1916 to speak to citizens of the Western states about the importance of American women standing together and winning the right to vote.
FOR MORE INFORMATION: The following YouTube portrayal of Inez Milholland leading the 1913 women’s suffrage parade is enhanced by Hollywood, but you get the idea in this selection from “Iron Jawed Angels,” the 2004 HBO production. YouTube link.
 
This audio selection below about Inez Milholland highlights the outpouring of grief and appreciation expressed at a memorial service in December 1916.

Audio selection, Inez Milholland tribute, 1916, in Washington, DC at the time of her death. From Jailed for Freedom by Doris Stevens, 1920. Audio by Librivox. Edited by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. For resources and Inez Milholland information, consult InezMilhollandCentennial.com

Memorial service for U.S. suffrage martyr, Inez Milholland, in 1916: a suffrage centennial special! on Vimeo.

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November 2017 suffrage festivities and focus in New York State

 

The New York Women’s Vote Centennial Project is a partnership on the NYS governor and lt. governor and the American Federation of Teachers and First Book celebrating the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New York on November 6, 2017. The competition invites teachers to develop classroom projects and activities to mark the suffrage centennial. Fifteen winners will be chosen.

Projects may focus on women’s history, civic engagement, the democratic process, equal rights, or a related topic. Educators and students are encouraged to explore the question: 100 years from now, when future generations look back, what will our equal rights legacy be?  Projects for any grade, K-12, will be considered. October 11, 2017 is the application deadline.

The New York State Women’s Suffrage Commission, chaired by Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul, is organizing programs to commemorate women’s suffrage between 2017, To learn more, visit www.ny.gov/suffrage.

STATE SUFFRAGE CONFERENCE ON NOVEMBER 4, 2017

The New York Women’s Suffrage Centennial Conference, celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State, will be held on Saturday, November 4 at the Archives Partnership Trust headquarters located at the Cultural Education Center, 222 Madison Avenue, Empire State Plaza in Albany.

The celebration continues after the conference when the League of Women Voters of New York State Education Foundation and the New York State Archives host an opening reception of Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial. Votes for Women is an exhibition organized by the New York State Museum to commemorate the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote in New York State. For more information on the evening reception and for tickets, click here.

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Who and what is causing the waves over women’s suffrage centennial events?

High Tea in the Spirit of 1776 on Vimeo.

THE WOMEN’S VOTE CENTENNIAL (WVCI)

The Women’s Vote Centennial (WVCI) is an on-the-ground initiative of those across the nation determined that the 2020 centennial of American women voting isn’t lost in the swamp of current events. Hosted by the NWP (the National Woman’s Party) in Washington, DC, the effort is driven by love and determination to make sure the centennial doesn’t come and go in a whimper. The initiative encourages local, state, and national recognition of this extraordinary grassroots campaign that started long before the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention that became a turning point in the struggle continuing to today. Follow the national organizing effort for 2020.

To volunteer, find out about programs and activities, visit the NWP web site.

If you have a project or event celebrating women’s initiatives, let us know. 

THE WOMEN’S STATUE FUND FOR CENTRAL PARK IN NYC

The Statue Fund for Central Park is breaking the bronze ceiling to create the first statue of real women in the 164-year history of NYC’s Central Park, the Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony Woman Suffrage Movement Monument, according to Pam Elam, president of the initiative. “For me this project is all about rethinking the past and reshaping the future. You may well wonder how we can do that with one statue. And the answer is that it’s not just about one statue of two figures with the names of many others incorporated in the design—it’s about a movement.

“It’s about the largest nonviolent revolution in the history of this nation when over half the population was enfranchised. It’s an instant history lesson. It’s an examination of how social change comes about. It’s learning from the past to do a better job of fighting for equality and justice in the future. It’s challenging municipalities all across this nation and this world to honor all the people who made those cities great by including tributes to women and people of color in their public spaces. But most of all, it’s about completing the journeys toward justice of the valiant women who came before us and achieving the full equality for women that they were denied. It’s about the incredible power of moving history forward.”

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More programs about women’s rights during 2017!

Patriotic protest women’s suffrage movement artifact on exhibit during 2017! from on Vimeo.

EqualiTEA on August 26, 2017, 2-4 p.m. in Lorton, VA. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial.

“HEAR THEM ROAR:   THE FIGHT FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS” is a devised & environmental theatre performance directed by Nan Smithner. Program in Educational Theatre. LOCATION: Black Box Theatre. ADMISSION: $15 General, $5 Students & Seniors. For tickets, contact New York University box office. ONLINE: tickets.nyu.edu. BY PHONE: 212-998-4941. IN PERSON: 566 LaGuardia Place (at Washington Square South). Performances: Friday, October 20 at 8 pm Saturday, October 21 at 8 pm Sunday, October 22 at 3 pm Thursday, October 26 at 8 pm Friday, October 27 at 8 pm Saturday, October 28 at 8 pm Sunday, October 29 at 3 pm.

Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford, will host a women’s suffrage centennial luncheon at 11 a.m. Sept. 23. Sally Roesch Wagner will present “The Rest of the Story of the Suffrage Movement,” a dialogue about the issues of equality raised by the country’s suffrage foremothers. The luncheon will feature rebel soup and salmagundi served with suffrage salad dressing, from suffragette cookbooks published from 1886-1920 to raise money for the cause. The museum will offer activities that highlight equality efforts made by women during the 19th century.Cost is $40-$45 and includes admission to the museum. To purchase tickets, visit bit.ly/2uYxItW.

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Suffrage Centennial News Notes 2017

GET INVOLVED WITH “PROTECTING THE LEGACY”

“Protecting the Legacy” is a state-wide effort in Tennessee to digitize oral histories, photographs, documents, and other memorabilia on African American women’s political activity, voting history and suffrage. The project is organized by Chick History, a women’s history nonprofit, in partnership with Humanities Tennessee and a diverse set of committees and partners across Tennessee – as part of a statewide project to commemorate the upcoming centennial of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment in 2020.

The history project is looking for stories, photographs, letters, and family history about African-American women and activism as well as stories and experiences of early African-American women voters, 1930 and earlier. For more information about participating, please visit www.protect.chickhistory.org or email: info@chickhistory.com. The project will continue over the next two years.

OUTREACH FROM THE OFFICE OF STATE HISTORY IN NEW YORK

News and information relevant to the history profession in New York State, including new digital and public history projects, events, scholarship, as well as reflections and suggestions on teaching and writing, reviews of (new and old) historically-oriented movies, TV shows, and books. To contribute, contact the Office of State History via email at: statehistory@nysed.gov with a short pitch.

THE 19TH AMENDMENT TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION —CELEBRATE ON AUGUST 26TH

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States of by any State on account of sex. On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution, and women in America finally gained the legal right to vote.

For 97 years, women and men across the county have recognized this special observance. Rep. Bella Abzug (D-NY), had the U.S. Congress designate August 26 as “Women’s Equality Day” in 1971 to commemorate the 1920 certification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution.

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Planning an outing in July? Seneca Falls, NY is the place to go!

News Notes for Women’s Suffrage Centennial events & celebrations! on Vimeo.

Mark your calendar for Friday, July 14, 2017 from 5:30 to 9:30 pm at the New York Chiropractic College in Seneca Falls, NY. Tickets are $60 each. For reservations, call (315) 568- 5838 or stop by The Seneca Falls It’s a Wonderful Life Museum, 32 Fall St., Seneca Falls. For more information, call (315) 568-5838.

The celebration on July 14 is part of the NYS suffrage centennial, launched with a Thanksgiving Dinner Gala entitled “A Fine Agitation” followed by the premiere of a one-woman play about Dr. Mary Walker, the only American woman to receive the Medal of Honor. The dinner, being served at at the New York Chiropractic College, will be based on a 1916 Thanksgiving menu from The Hoag House, precursor to The Gould Hotel.

The gala will also commemorate the Centennial of the first woman elected to Congress, Jeanette Rankin from Montana. All women currently serving in Congress will be recognized as well as the 50th anniversary of Another Mother for Peace. Born in Oswego, New York, Dr. Mary Walker was one of the earliest women in the United States to earn a medical degree. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, she volunteered to work on the battlefields caring for the wounded. Denied a commission as a medical officer because she was a woman, she volunteered and was eventually appointed assistant surgeon. Captured in 1864, she spent four months as a prisoner of war in a Richmond prison. Dr. Walker lectured throughout the United States and abroad on women’s rights, equality, dress reform, health and temperance issues. She rejected corsets and hoop-skirted dresses, preferring to wear men’s trousers, jackets and a top hat.She was arrested in New York City for impersonating a man. Dr. Mary Walker was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls in 2000.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.