Tag Archive | Inez Milholland

“They stood together so we could stand out,” Turning Point Suffragist Memorial!

Support Turning Point Suffragist Memorial—the fundraising for the suffragist memorial proposed for Lorton, Virginia. Work is underway. The plan is to open the memorial by 2020 when American women will have been voting for 100 years.

The suffragist memorial is the only commemorative institution of its type. It is important as a symbol to keep the goal of equality alive.

Visit the web site: SuffragistMemorial.org

Take a look at the InezMilholland centennial blog: InezMilholland.wordpress.com

And keep supporting Suffrage Centennials as we chug along!

You have a head start by following Suffrage Centennials!

You’ll be walking arm and arm with us here at Suffrage Centennials when you get the frontline view of the demonstrations—and there were many—organized by women and their men allies in the struggle to win the vote. We refer to the “suffrage movement” now as the first wave of the women’s rights movement in the United States. The women of the first wave believed they were addressing the gender imbalance by winning voting rights. It wasn’t easy standing up to be counted. If they hadn’t set the first wave rolling, it would have waited until much later to accomplish such a difficult task.

FROM NEW ZEALAND: The government of New Zealand is interested in purchasing the former home of New Zealand women’s suffrage movement leader, Kate Sheppard. The building failed to sell at auction in Christchurch. It is where Sheppard collected thousands of signatures for a petition for women’s right to vote in 1893. The Clyde Road property is a Category 1 listed Historic Place and has a council valuation of $3.15 million.

WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY NEWS: August 26th was commemorated in 2018 by a wide range of organizations across the nation. Here is one such message from the national League of Women Voters.

The Alice Paul Institute sent out this communication for August 26th.

A MESSAGE FROM SUFFRAGE CENTENNIALS!

Suffrage Centennials has a lot to say about these hundred-year observances. After 100 years, it’s fascinating to see what has been accomplished, as well as get out our “to do” lists to plan for the long way still to go. We’re tracking centennial observances. So, come along:

Check in with the centennial blog carving out a path into the unknown to get the name of Inez Milholland (our U.S. suffrage martyr) recognized as a household name. Take at look at: InezMilholland.wordpress.com

In 2023 American women will have been working for equal rights in the U.S. Constitution for 100 years. Keep this in mind.

At Suffrage Centennials— we’ve been blogging since 2013.

International Day of the Girl—Are you ready for 2020, the nation’s suffrage centennial?

October 11th is the International Day of the Girl, as declared by the United Nations. Photo below by UN Women. The UN observers state the following: “The world’s 1.1 billion girls are a source of power, energy, and creativity – and the millions of girls in emergencies are no exception. This year’s International Day of the Girl (IDG) on October 11th marks the beginning of a year-long effort to spur global attention and action to the challenges and opportunities girls face before, during, and after crises.”

Are you planning with your organization for a 2020 observance of the 100 years of American women voting? What will you do personally, in terms of advocacy, to honor the past 100 years of women voting in the United States?

Are you following the campaign to honor Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr, from now to 2020?

Support the New York State Museum in putting the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon on permanent exhibit! Find out about the state museum’s renovation and expansion.

Support Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is opening its doors in 2020 to celebrate the national suffrage centennial! In 2020, the Central Park statue in NYC will be unveiled. Vision 2020 will celebrate in Philadelphia.

Special message from Molly Murphy MacGregor with IMPT news!

The co-founder of the National Women’s History Project, Molly Murphy MacGregor, made an important announcement affirming two things—that the organization will be changing its name and that making August 26th a federal holiday is an important priority for the citizens of the United States. Here is her message:

My friends,

This is just the beginning of our effort to ensure that August 26. 2020 will be declared as a federal holiday,  Many have been waiting to contact their elective representatives until after the November election to begin their lobbying effort.  Still, others have already begun and are organizing events, celebrations, and demonstrations throughout the county.  Whatever you have decided to do, the National Women’s History Alliance, formerly known as the National Women’s History Project will be with you all the way.

In the past, this has been a slow time of the year for us, but that will probably never be true again.  With my retirement just 29 months ahead, we are in the depths of planning an extensive transition.

We have begun by changing our name to the National Women’s History Alliance which better explains our work and focus. We will emphasize and solidify our work as the national clearinghouse for multicultural women’s history.  The name change has become official, but our big announcement will be in January 2019 with the publication and distribution of the 2019 Women’s History Gazette.

It is our hope that you will be active in promoting women’s history and even in recruiting new Alliance members. One of the goals of the National Women’s History Alliance is to expand the celebrations of women’s history past March and into the rest of the year.  Until after the 2020 Centennial, we will be producing two Gazettes, the first will focus on the year’s theme and honorees (to be celebrated throughout the year) and the second will focus on the importance of the women’s full participation in our democracy.  We are excited about all our new plans and we could really use your help.

We are in the process of seeking new Board and Committee members.  If you would like to participate more closely in the array of activities and promotions we do, please let me know.  I would be happy to give you more information depending on your interest and the commitment you would like to make. Please email me at nwhp@nwhp.org.

I hope you will celebrate Women’s Equality Day now and in the future.  This is a link to some great ways to celebrate.  https://www.bustle.com/p/10-productive-ways-to-spend-womens-equality-day-2018-10193052

Sending lots of good wishes – Forward Together!

Molly Murphy MacGregor.

REMEMBER INEZ MILHOLLAND, THE US SUFFRAGE MARTYR!

In 2016 the National Women’s History Project honored Inez Milholland with a year long observance of 100 years since her death.

Follow the Inez centennial blog.

Suffrage Centennials is gearing up for 2020, the centennial of American women voting. It’s also an election year.

Bringing Hattie Redmond and Inez Milholland out in the open!

EFFORT CONTINUES TO HONOR INEZ MILHOLLAND

One bulletin from Suffrage Wagon News Channel focuses on the continuing effort to bring Inez Milholland, the US suffrage martyr, to public attention. Over one hundred years have passed since her death, a turning point in the struggle of American women to win the right to vote.

The National Women’s History Project set aside 2016 to acknowledge the sacrifice of Inez Milholland. Marguerite Kearns and Robert P.J. Cooney coordinated the effort. InezMilhollandCentennial.com  And the centennial blog honoring Inez MIlholland continues publishing. Check it out.

InezMilholland.wordpress.com

Also: Twitter.com/SuffrageMartyr

NEWS FROM OREGON

Oregon’s statewide commemoration of women gaining access to the vote in 2012 has many highlights, and one of them is the uncovering of the history of black suffragist Harriet “Hattie” Redmond. She was intimately involved in the campaign of 1912 by holding rallies and hosting speakers at her church, serving on the central planning committee, and registering to vote in early 1913 after Oregon’s constitution was amended. Recently Oregon State University announced that one of their buildings is being renamed the  Hattie Redmond Women and Gender Center. This is part of an effort to rename campus buildings associated with slave owners and supporters of slavery at OSU.

More interest than ever is being generated by the upcoming 2020 national suffrage centennial with the centennial observance of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution. The UK is celebrating its 100th year of women voting during 2018.

SUFFRAGE CENTENNIALS LOOKS FORWARD TO 2020

Follow: SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views. Celebrate women’s history on Labor Day. The amount of effort and strenuous work put into the first wave of the women’s rights movement is being recognized, finally!

HAPPY WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY…!

JOIN THE WOMEN’S HISTORY ALLIANCE: Membership is free though the National Women’s History Project that is making it a priority to work toward making August 26th a federal holiday. Sign up at the NWHP store.

Use the NWHP Gazette to hand out at special events. Order at the NWHP store.

STICKERS OF INEZ MILHOLLAND COMING SOON TO NWHP STORE

While you’re waiting for the stickers to come in, order an Inez Milholland button. These have been popular to hand out when showing the 15-minute film, “Forward into Light,” the feature video produced by Martha Wheelock and Wild West Women. Order the button through the NWHP online store. There’s also an Inez centennial poster and a book about Inez Milholland’s last campaign by Robert P.J. Cooney, Jr. Take note! And we’ll let you know when the Inez stickers are available.

InezMilholland.wordpress.com is the blog for the Inez centennial web site. 

August 26, 2020 is the focal point of the centennial of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution when American women will have been voting for 100 years. Have you started planning yet for a special program during 2020?

Visit our sister sites: Suffrage Wagon News Channel and LetsRockTheCradle.com

NEWS and reminder about August 26th—Women’s Equality Day!

Women’s Equality Day has its own entry on Wikipedia. It tells anyone who visits the internet that the day of August 26th is to commemorate the adoption of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution guaranteeing women’s right to vote and the long and lonely decades dedicated to its passage.

Women’s Equality Day was first celebrated in 1973, and every year the US President announces the observance. But don’t be fooled. It is not a national holiday although many people are advocating for this. The National Women’s History Project (nwhp.org) has put out a call for supporters of making August 26th a national holiday. Membership is free.

NATIONAL EQUALITY PLEDGE

Kamala Lopez, filmmaker of “Equal Means Equal,” is working on distributing a national equality pledge to identify elected officials with their stand on the Equal Rights Amendment. Many grassroots and supporting organizations are using “Equal Means Equal” and other contemporary films and videos for fundraising. “Iron Jawed Angels” remains a popular choice.

INEZ MILHOLLAND IS STILL IN THE PUBLIC EYE

The New  York Times has identified Inez Milholland as number three on a list of ten women who would be good choices for a statue in NYC. Milholland gave her life for women’s right to vote. She died when on the lecture trail in 1916 from pernicious anemia. In 2016, the National Women’s History Project sponsored a year to bring Inez Milholland’s story out of the background and to the attention of the nation. Marguerite Kearns and Robert P.J. Cooney directed the effort. Martha Wheelock produced a film, “Forward into Light,” a 15 minute film about Inez. Thousands of films were distributed free throughout the nation. Follow the Inez Milholland centennial blog for news and views about this continuing effort:

InezMilholland.wordpress.com

IN OTHER NEWS—Tennessee and Washington, DC:

The Tennessee Woman Suffrage Board has sent out invitations to a celebration on Saturday, August 25, 2018 at 11 a.m. at the Tennessee Woman Suffrage Monument
 Centennial Park in Nashville. Completed suffrage monuments, now part of the landscape in Tennessee, include Jackson, Knoxville and Nashville. Three more are in progress: 
Chattanooga, Clarksville, and Memphis. Open to the public. A lawn chair and umbrella for rain or shade from the sun is recommended for the August 25th event.

The National Women’s History Museum is promoting tours, starting today, that follow the 1913 woman suffrage parade through DC. The tour starts at the Capitol Reflecting Pool by the Grant Memorial. The tour covers 1.5 miles, lasts about two hours, and ends in Lafayette Square across from the White House. Dates include August 11, 17, 18, 24 and 31, 2018. Contact the Museum web site for more information and cost.

UPDATE ON TURNING POINT SUFFRAGIST MEMORIAL:

 

SuffrageCentennials.com continues to work toward 2020, the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Follow us on the blog, Twitter, Facebook, and email subscription.

New Zealand celebrating 125 years of women voting!

New Zealand women have been voting for the past 125 years! This observance is being accompanied with planning to erect a plaque to commemorate 1893 to 2018 by the Walmate Edwardian Heritage Group. Records show that on a suffrage petition submitted to Parliament on July 28, 1893, the names and addresses of about 24,000 women aged over 21 were featured.

Honor Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr! on Vimeo.

Be prepared for the reactions of some Americans who don’t want to be reminded that U.S. women will have been voting for 100 years in 2020.

Also, there are Americans who want to see August 26th designated as a national holiday.

It’s uncomfortable to many citizens that after almost 100 years of women voting, no women has been elected to serve in the Oval Office in Washington, DC.

Also—in 2023, U.S. women will have been working for 100 years to guarantee equal rights for women under the U.S. Constitution.

The above video was produced in 2016, the 100th anniversary of the death of Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr. Many American women have no idea that Inez Milholland died in 1916 for women’s voting rights.

Follow the Inez Milholland centennial blog. Find out the larger context at SuffrageCentennials.com

Stop by Suffrage Wagon News Channel to find out about the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon used by Edna Kearns and others that was on exhibit at the New  York State Museum from 2017 to 2018. The wagon is a symbol of the agitation around women’s voting rights. Support the New York State Museum in finding a way to put the wagon on permanent exhibit, for now and future generations.

UK Suffrage Centennial: Plus centennial news & the honoring of suffrage martyr Inez Milholland

Follow the news in the centennial blog still ongoing that features news and views about Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr. InezMilholland.wordpress.com See also the Twitter feed for Inez: Twitter.com/SuffrageMartyr

SuffrageCentennials.com publishes by way of email, Twitter, and Facebook.

SUFFRAGE NEWS: “First Women UK” will exhibit 100 portraits of first women in the UK in a striking and immersive exhibition at the Dyson Gallery, Royal College of Art in London starting on July 20 2018 and continuing through August 22 to mark the anniversary of the centenary of women’s right to vote. Photographer Anita Corbin has officially unveiled her 10 year project documenting 100 pioneering 21st century women who have achieved the landmark title ‘First Woman’ across a range of disciplines including sport, media, military, faith, business, arts, music and politics. 

The National Portrait Gallery has purchased eight of the portraits for the UK archive and a book of the entire First Women UK collection is scheduled for a 2018 publication. The exhibition: Dyson Gallery, Royal College of Art, Riverside, 1 Hester Road London SW11 4AN.

Stay in touch with the National Women’s History Project that has been working to write women into US history for more than 40 years. A special luncheon and program in California will recognize the History Project’s Honorees on August 18, 2018. Information on the NWHP website.

Visit suffrage-friendly web platforms: LetsRockTheCradle.com and SuffrageWagon.org

National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, NY raising money for expansion!!

Suffrage Centennial celebrations are out in the open like never before! on Vimeo.

The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York (womenofthehall.org) is planning to make its new headquarters fully available to the public during 2020 at the former Seneca Knitting Mill in Seneca Falls. The new facility will have exhibits, a conference room, office spaces, a reception area, gardens, and more. The fundraising campaign is ongoing. The NWHF will announce its new inductees into the women’s national hall of fame sometime next year.

Other organizations have put 2020 on their schedules to meet the national centennial deadline. This includes numerous groups and associations on the state level, including the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative (2020centennial.org), the national clearinghouse, that will be publishing a calendar of events and celebrations for 2020 when US women will have been voting for 100 years.

The statue of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony proposed for Central park in NYC is expected to be unveiled during 2020 as part of the national centennial celebration. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is also expected to open its doors during 2020.

The New York State suffrage centennial in 2017 really demonstrated what can be done with focus, funding, and determination. New York passed legislation establishing a suffrage centennial commission that will be in operation through 2020. The centennial observance of U.S. suffrage martyr, Inez Milholland, in 2016 is still ongoing. There are videos galore on a wide range of suffrage-related topics and a growing awareness by many that 2020, when American women will have voted for 100 years, will have an impact far behind what we could have imagined.

Are you planning to celebrate August 26, 2018— Women’s Equality Day? What plans are underway for you during 2020, our national suffrage centennial?

SuffrageCentennials.com has been publishing since 2013.