Tag Archive | Elizabeth Cady Stanton

The Tale of the Fourth of July Co-conspirators for your suffrage centennial event!

Declaration_

Gather your friends around and help them picture the scene. Susan B. Anthony is ready to move in with Matilda Joslyn Gage, Sara Andrews Spencer, Lillie Devereau Blake, and Phoebe W. Couzins to crash the July 4th, 1876 centennial event in Philadelphia. The platform is filled with dignitaries and the co-conspirators wait until after the reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Here is what happened: Anthony marched up to the platform filled with centennial officials. She formally presented the Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States, an update on the declaration from back in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York.

The document sent the message that the nation must not turn its back on the unfinished American Revolution by denying women equality and the right to vote.

After delivering the proclamation, Anthony and others distributed copies to the crowd and left the centennial hall. THE RESULT: Pandemonium. General Howley, chairman, shouted for order to be restored.

THE OUTCOME: Suffrage activists held their own independence celebration in Philadelphia.

HOLD YOUR OWN CELEBRATION THIS YEAR AS YOU PLAN FOR THE 2020 NATIONAL CENTENNIAL OBSERVATION OF VOTES FOR WOMEN.

IN 2020, AMERICAN WOMEN WILL HAVE BEEN VOTING FOR 100 YEARS.

The July 4th Co-conspirators

AUDIO ACCOUNT OF WHAT HAPPENED on July 4, 1876 at the Fourth of July national centennial, as told by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in her memoir, Eighty Years and More. Read by Amelia Bowen for Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

NOW, LET’S FIRE UP THE BARBEQUE GRILL in 2018 and have fun!
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Parties for Elizabeth Cady Stanton in November: 200 years old, plus “Suffragette” film spin

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Birthday parties for Elizabeth Cady Stanton in New York during November! on Vimeo.

It’s a terrific time to be celebrating the 200th birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The “Suffragette” film has been released in the United States. And just as we hoped, the release of “Suffragette” is bringing attention to the U.S. movement to win voting rights for women. It’s been in the shadows far too long. Even Time Magazine this week highlighted the centennial observance of the 1915 big suffrage parade in New York City. And there’s more to come (we hope)!

The 200th birthday party for Mrs. Stanton at Cooper Union on November 12, 2015 (7:30 p.m.) includes a long lineup of entertainers and performers for the program, “Declaration of Sentiments: The Remix.” It’s presented by the NYC Department of Records and Information Services and WomensActivism.NYC at The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 7 East 7th Street, New York, NY 10003 sponsored by the City of NY, Mayors Fund to Advance NYC, The Cooper Union, and Lebenthal Asset Management.

The occasion is also being celebrated in Seneca Falls, NY on November 14, 2015 at the the Women’s Rights National Historical Park. The event starts at 4 p.m. with a “Winter Wheat Gathering” inside the Wesleyan Chapel, site of the first Women’s Rights Convention in 1848. Dramatic re-enactments by historical researchers, biographers, and interpreters will honor Mrs. Stanton’s women’s rights activism. At 6 p.m., the event will move to Fall Street, the Gould Hotel, for a reception with birthday cake, punch, and dancing. All events are free and open to the public. The public is invited to dress in 19th century period attire. Women’s Rights National Historical Park is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information: (315) 568-2991.
RESOURCES:
Send birthday wishes to Mrs. Stanton to be displayed in the Seneca Falls national park visitors’ center. For electronic and video birthday sentiments, forward them to wori_information_desk@nps.gov. For cards and letters, mail them to Elizabeth Cady Stanton at Women’s Rights NHP, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls, NY, 13148.
UPDATE ON ANTHONY-STANTON STATUE PROJECT IN CENTRAL PARK
The fund to build statues in Central Park (NYC) of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony is accepting pledges and contributions for the design and creation of the statue as well as for organizing, outreach and media efforts. Checks are payable to The Stanton and Anthony Statue Fund, POB 150-074 Van Brunt Station, Brooklyn, NY 11215-9997. StantonandAnthonyStatueFund@gmail.com.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

Big birthday bash in NYC, plus suffrage centennial news notes

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SuffrageCentennials.com is partnering with WomensActivism.NYC and the NYC Department of Records and Information Services on spreading the word about the event, “Declaration of Sentiments: The Remix” scheduled for November 12, 2015, 7:30 p.m., at the Great Hall at Cooper Union in NYC. The focus is the celebration of New York’s 2017 suffrage centennial and the 200th birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

The ticket buying link is: https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10039568 

Performers include Sweet Honey in the Rock, Samantha Bee, Carrie Mae Weems, Sharon Van Etten, Dan Zanes, Princess Nokia, Tona Brown, Carl Hancock Rux, LAVA, Nadia Shahram, Poets Aja Monet, Crystal Valentine and Ramya Ramana, Girl Be Heard, Cat Glennon and Tora Lopez, Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls presents Harsh Crowd.

IN OTHER NEWS: Important conference set for October 15, 2015 in Canada to prepare for its 2016 suffrage centennial. The NYS Cultural Heritage Tourism Network held a conference last week to drum up business for New York’s 2017 suffrage centennial. A preview of the “Suffragette” film shown at a National Women’s Hall of Fame program was one perk of the gathering. Watch for the opening of “Suffragette” at a theatre near you. Ten new women were inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, NY for 2015.

“The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is featured on Suffrage Bookshelf. The next episode of “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling is scheduled for October 8, 2015: “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling. Great stories for teaching and learning about this important part of American history. What does cooking have to do with suffrage centennials? The Votes for Women movement produced its own cookbooks for fundraising purposes. For the past year one cooking school has been dreaming up recipes and feature articles that remind us of this fact. Farmers’ markets will be ending their seasons soon. Stock up for the winter while there’s still time.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

New York State could blow its 2017 suffrage centennial celebration or it can lead the way to 2020!

Goal of 200 storytelling videos about women’s suffrage movement makes learning American history easy for young people on Vimeo.

Just because New York State has an opportunity to market its unique position as the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States doesn’t mean it will be successful. All the pieces are in place for New York to walk into the sunset with the entire nation and the world paying attention. This requires a correct balance of circumstances and attitude. If New York State believes it can bus people in from China and Australia and have them leave excited, it’s possible. And it’s more likely that the intentions will be good but there won’t be the necessary followup and input and grassroots support to make it work. The key is in bringing the right balance of excitement and connection together, to link the past and present and redefine the “Spirit of 1776” for a new time and place and set of conditions in this contemporary world.

WE COULD BLOW THIS OPPORTUNITY, OR ALL THE PIECES COULD COME TOGETHER!

Today the internet is exploding with stories of suffrage activists. Sometimes they’re called suffragettes. Other times they’re referred to as suffragists. In the past, some women preferred one term over the other which is why we here on SuffrageCentennials.com refer to votes for women advocates as suffrage activists. It’s important to not leave anyone out. Many different types of people were involved in shaking up the status quo during this time in history, including men and those who opposed the idea of women voting altogether.

Women vote in high numbers today. More than at any other time in history, there’s a fascination with storytelling about the votes for women movement. We even find descendants of the anti-suffragists lamenting the day women won the right to vote. It’s essential the entire story of the suffrage movement be told: the warts, the compromises, the courage, especially the parts revealing the movement’s weaknesses and prejudices.

LET’S TELL THE TRUTH, THE WHOLE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT…!

Women of the 20th century didn’t invent racism, classism, and sexism. They inherited it. We’re all born into this social and economic system where discrimination and prejudice is profitable, which is why women’s suffrage storytelling can bring us together as we peel back the layers. The storytelling about this remarkable social movement of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers, other family members and ancestors has the potential of completing the unfinished American Revolution, hopefully in our lifetimes.

There are so many stories to tell. Women’s suffrage storytelling was featured on Suffrage Wagon Cafe on July 8, 2015. Storytelling features the women of the past reaching out through time to meet us where we are today. Transferring the messages and spirit and content into upcoming women’s suffrage events and celebrations is up to us. Let’s get together to celebrate suffrage centennial celebrations, whether in New York State in 2017 or the national observance of the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 2020!

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. And don’t forget to pass on women’s suffrage storytelling to the next generation. Suffrage Centennial videos on Vimeo.

 

Story of the Fourth of July co-conspirators

Do you know the story of the five co-conspirators who crashed a national Fourth of July centennial celebration?If not, you aren’t alone.

Picture the scene: July 4, 1876. Philadelphia, PA. A national celebration with visitors from all over the world.
The platform’s filled with dignitaries, but the co-conspirators waited until after the reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Declaration

At this very moment Susan B. Anthony was ready to make a move along with Matilda Joslyn Gage, Sara Andrews Spencer, Lillie Devereau Blake, and Phoebe W. Couzins.

Anthony marched up to the platform filled with centennial officials. She formally presented the Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States, an update on the declaration from back in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York.

THE MESSAGE: that the nation must not turn its back on the Unfinished American Revolution by denying women equality and the right to vote.

After delivering the proclamation, Anthony and others distributed copies to the crowd and left the centennial hall. THE RESULT: Pandemonium. General Howley, chairman, shouted for order to be restored.

THE OUTCOME: Suffrage activists held their own independence celebration in Philadelphia.

The July 4th Co-conspirators

AUDIO ACCOUNT OF WHAT HAPPENED on July 4, 1876 at the Fourth of July national centennial, as told by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in her memoir, Eighty Years and More. Read by Amelia Bowen for Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

NOW, LET’S FIRE UP THE BARBEQUE GRILL in 2015 and have some fun!
Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event. Suffrage Centennials Vimeo channel.

Thinking about travel to Seneca Falls, NY: Listen to audio podcast, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Convention Days in Seneca Falls, NYWhat's to see in Seneca Falls, NY

July is the month to celebrate the 1848 Women’s Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. And if you’re planning to visit Seneca Falls, NY for the annual three-day celebration, note the dates. July 17, 18, and 19, 2015. Consult the Convention Days web site for the daily schedule. And then start by listening to the short podcasts from Elizabeth Cady Stanton reporting from her early days living in Seneca Falls, NY up to the point of the July 1848 convention and after.

And now the entire audio series of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Audio by Librivox. Production by Suffage Wagon News Channel. The June program of Suffrage Wagon Cafe featured visiting Seneca Falls, NY with videos, audio, and recommendations for travelers. Take note of the special report on the 1848 Seneca Falls convention on SuffrageCentennials.com  Visit our TRAVEL link with travel notes and recommendations.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event with Suffrage Centennials Vimeo channel.

Special report about Seneca Falls women’s rights conference in 1848!

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Special report about Seneca Falls women’s rights convention! on Vimeo.

If you’re expecting Seneca Falls, NY to be like Disneyland, you’ll be disappointed. The town and its past is better suited to an introduction to how women’s history and American history intersect. And those interested include regular tourists as well as those who view their travel as a journey or a pilgrimage to the roots of our history as a nation. There’s a special report, now available on the web site of the Women’s Rights National Historic Park, that will give you a shot in the arm of understanding the significance of the 1848 women’s rights convention. And if you’re headed to Seneca Falls in the future, it’s a recommended read before you leave town.

The Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement, a special report by Dr. Judith Wellman, puts the conference into perspective and adds to other discussions about whether or not the 1848 convention was all people claimed it to be. There had been stirrings about women’s rights long before 1848, but Wellman notes that the Seneca Falls convention marks the “beginning of the organized women’s rights movement.”

The Seneca Falls gathering set the model for women’s conventions. It nailed the theme of the movement, that is, the connection between women’s rights and the nation’s founding ideals. Seneca Falls set the agenda for the suffrage movement and modeled methods for moving toward the goal of equality. In short, Seneca Falls was a “pivotal” event, one that Wellman argues in a comprehensive report, a perspective that’s also reflected in her 2004 book, The Road to Seneca Falls; Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the First Woman’s Rights Convention.

Read the special report. Find out what else is being said about Seneca Falls, such as the work, The Myth of Seneca Falls: Memory and the Women’s Suffrage Movement, 1848-1898 by Lisa Tetrault. And take into consideration what’s going on in Seneca Falls, NY during 2015, such as Convention Days in July. And check out the special program about Seneca Falls at Suffrage Wagon Cafe in June. Seneca Falls, NY is expected to be a hot spot for travelers during the 2017 New York suffrage centennial. Get a jumpstart now!

Check out other travel destinations.

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Many things Elizabeth Cady Stanton related during her 200th birthday year!

November 2015 birthday for StantonThe Elizabeth Cady Stanton Hometown Association is the go-to place for events and celebrations in upstate New  York during the year of the 200th birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Listing of events in Fulton and Montgomery Counties. The Elizabeth Cady Stanton Women’s Consortium has a terrific web site to visit. The Elizabeth Cady Stanton Women’s Symposium was first held in Johnstown, NY to continue the work of that city’s most-famous daughter. An outcome of the 2006 Symposium was the creation of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Women’s Consortium.

It’s time to “remember the ladies” in Central Park, NYC. Plans are moving forward with the Central Park statue project that will honor Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton with the 2020 suffrage centennial observance in mind. The approval of NYC Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver enables The Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony Statue Fund, Inc. to accept pledges and contributions for the design and creation of the statue as well as for organizing, outreach, and media efforts. Because of the pro bono assistance of Morrison Foerster, the Statue Fund has been granted tax-exempt status under section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue code. Contributions to the Fund are tax-deductible.

And don’t forget the November 2015 birthday bash in New York City at Cooper Union!

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event.

Book rescues Isabella Beecher Hooker from obscurity & opens our eyes to the radical activist who edited Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s speeches!

Isabella Hooker

Pilgrimage: A long journey, especially one undertaken as a quest.

This article by Olivia Twine is a journey into the past to meet Isabella Beecher Hooker, the half sister of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Our goal is to understand and appreciate generations of activists on whose strong shoulders we stand today. Books like this one enrich our experience when we visit historic homes, museums, and cultural heritage sites as part of upcoming women’s suffrage centennial celebrations from now through 2020, the nation’s suffrage centennial.

Olivia Twine introduces us to Isabella Beecher Hooker by highlighting Susan Campbell’s new book, Tempest-Tossed, The Spirit of Isabella Beecher Hooker (Wesleyan University Press, Middletown, CT, 2014).

Olivia recommends visiting the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford, Connecticut in the heart of the Nook Farm neighborhood that was developed by John Hooker and where John and Isabella Beecher Hooker resided. http://www.harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/ The Connecticut History website provides information about Nook Farm and its famous residents. http://connecticuthistory.org/?s=nook+farm  Information about Isabella and her times can also be gleaned from a visit to the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Cincinnati, Ohio. http://stowehousecincy.org/.

Isabella Beecher Hookerby Olivia Twine

Many of us heard in school about Harriet Beecher Stowe, but most likely little or nothing about Harriet’s sister, Isabella. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Susan Campbell has opened the door to an extraordinary story in her book, Tempest-Tossed, The Spirit of Isabella Beecher Hooker. This work focuses on the most radical, enigmatic, and unappreciated member of the Beecher family, Isabella.

Campbell engaged a spiritualist medium to contact her subject, who believed in communication with the dead and practiced it regularly. The author shines a light on Isabella’s complicated character, however, without any discernible help from beyond the grave.

The ninth child of the controversial minister Lyman Beecher, Isabella grew up in a household where freewheeling political debate took place at the kitchen table. Although her mother was bedridden and died young, Isabella learned how to present strong views. This was in spite of numerous disagreements with her older half-siblings, who included the later novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, education advocate Catherine Beecher, and the renowned minister Henry Ward Beecher.

Isabella ran counter to Beecher family sentiment regarding the “scandal of the 19th century” involving Henry Ward Beecher, the popular preacher at Plymouth Church in Brooklyn. Free-love advocate Victoria Woodhull accused Henry Ward Beecher of having an affair with the wife of a parishioner. Woodhull was infuriated by what she viewed as the hypocrisy of Henry’s pious sermons against her own free love position.

ISABELLA STOOD ALONE IN THE CONDEMNATION OF HER BROTHER EVERYONE CALLED “HENRY WARD”

Henry Ward BeecherIsabella believed her brother Henry Ward Beecher was guilty and said so publicly. She urged Henry to admit his wrongdoing. Her advice was imparted with love, but it wasn’t appreciated by Harriet, Catherine, nor sister Mary Beecher Perkins, all of whom denied Henry’s guilt and regarded Isabella as traitorous. The case went to trial and ended in a hung jury, nine to three in Henry’s favor.

Henry Ward Beecher’s charm was legendary. President Lincoln described him a great orator. Even divorce proponent Elizabeth Cady Stanton retreated from Isabella when she maintained her allegiance to Woodhull. It wasn’t because Stanton disagreed with Woodhull, but because she believed the controversy would hurt the suffrage movement cause. Isabella wouldn’t back away from the ever-controversial Woodhull and her unconventional views, including Spiritualism.

Isabella married John Hooker, a lawyer, in 1841. At home, the couple read law books aloud and discussed politics. The laws that kept married women from controlling their own money and property were unfair, Isabella insisted, and must be changed. John supported her activism. Later in life, after the death of their daughter Mary, John joined her in the practice of Spiritualism.

Isabella believed wholeheartedly in abolition and universal suffrage, and she fought for both by taking a leading role in the National Woman Suffrage Association spearheaded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Isabella founded the Connecticut Woman’s Suffrage Association and organized the first woman’s rights convention in Connecticut. She was a prolific public speaker and lobbied for the Married Woman’s Property Bill that she introduced to the Connecticut state legislature. It passed in 1877. She also addressed the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on the subject of women’s suffrage.

SISTER HARRIET BEECHER STOWE OVERSHADOWED ISABELLA, AN ACTIVIST IN HER OWN RIGHT

Nevertheless, Isabella felt insignificant next to her sister Harriet. The author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin was certainly sympathetic to the plight of those in bondage, but the ending of her novel indicated that former slaves should be sent to Africa, a place where most had never been. Isabella disagreed. Her sister Catherine was unmarried but lectured that a woman’s place was to “rule the world by ruling the household.” Isabella loved her own children but admitted that caring for them proved to be exhausting. Between speaking engagements, she took frequent water cures at distant resorts and worried about her parenting skills.

Spiritualism was popular during and after the Civil War when so many young men died in combat. Campbell relates Mark Twain’s description of a holiday party at the Hookers when a séance was underway upstairs. Isabella emerged brandishing an ax and charged downstairs in such a threatening manner that family members questioned her sanity and carved out a distance from Isabella. Despite her family’s opprobrium, Isabella continued to work with the Connecticut Woman’s Suffrage Association. She died January 25, 1907, two weeks after suffering a stroke.

Susan Campbell paints a revealing picture of the Beecher family that she says represented a fascinating journey during her eleven-year journey as a researcher. The Beechers were prolific writers and once the code of their handwriting was cracked, Campbell says an amazing world opened up to her.

Isabella caused quite a commotion in her own family which sadly led to her marginalization. Campbell points out how other early activists, like Isabella, have also been overlooked in the waves that Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony created. Susan Campbell does us an enormous service of not only bringing Isabella to our attention, but also filling in our understanding about the deeds and misdeeds of yet another early suffrage activist whose tireless dedication and persistence led to the opening up of opportunities for women today.

I knew nothing about Isabella Beecher Hooker before I read Susan Campbell’s book. I’m ready now to explore the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Connecticut and the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Ohio with a new appreciation. This is a tremendous contribution because Susan Campbell has succeeded brilliantly in informing us about this extraordinary activist as well as bringing Isabella’s spirit to our awareness from The Other Side.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event.

Full steam ahead for New York’s 2017 women’s suffrage centennial!

New York State is getting ready for its 2017 suffrage centennial on Vimeo.

Visualizing a suffrage centennial celebration is the first step in actualizing it. And it’s not merely an imaginative process. New York City is actively engaged in doing its part. There’s an exhibit at New York City’s Municipal Archives through June 2015; a call from the New York State Museum for artifacts to be on display at the 2017 exhibit, “Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial”; and a celebration of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s 200th birthday on Thursday, November 12, 2015 at the Great Hall at Cooper Union with an artistic interpretation of the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments. This is just the beginning. Buckle your seat belts. There’s more to come. Plan events and celebrations. Support the creation of a funded state centennial commission. And keep us posted about what you’re up to!

imagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event.