Tag Archive | 2020 suffrage centennial

National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, NY raising money for expansion!!

Suffrage Centennial celebrations are out in the open like never before! on Vimeo.

The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York (womenofthehall.org) is planning to make its new headquarters fully available to the public during 2020 at the former Seneca Knitting Mill in Seneca Falls. The new facility will have exhibits, a conference room, office spaces, a reception area, gardens, and more. The fundraising campaign is ongoing. The NWHF will announce its new inductees into the women’s national hall of fame sometime next year.

Other organizations have put 2020 on their schedules to meet the national centennial deadline. This includes numerous groups and associations on the state level, including the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative (2020centennial.org), the national clearinghouse, that will be publishing a calendar of events and celebrations for 2020 when US women will have been voting for 100 years.

The statue of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony proposed for Central park in NYC is expected to be unveiled during 2020 as part of the national centennial celebration. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is also expected to open its doors during 2020.

The New York State suffrage centennial in 2017 really demonstrated what can be done with focus, funding, and determination. New York passed legislation establishing a suffrage centennial commission that will be in operation through 2020. The centennial observance of U.S. suffrage martyr, Inez Milholland, in 2016 is still ongoing. There are videos galore on a wide range of suffrage-related topics and a growing awareness by many that 2020, when American women will have voted for 100 years, will have an impact far behind what we could have imagined.

Are you planning to celebrate August 26, 2018— Women’s Equality Day? What plans are underway for you during 2020, our national suffrage centennial?

SuffrageCentennials.com has been publishing since 2013.

Rock the Cradle and plan for August 26th, Women’s Equality Day! Find out how…

NEWS UPDATES: The National Women’s History Museum is planning a traveling multi-media exhibit to showcase women’s achievements that will hopefully launch in August of 2019 and travel through August 2021 to celebrate the 2020 national suffrage centennial when American women will have been voting for 100 years. Watch for the “One Woman, One Vote” film festival to celebrate the 2020 suffrage centennial.

Let’s rock the cradle! How? Watch! on Vimeo.

Let’s make August 26th—Women’s Equality Day—a national holiday. The current issue of “How Women Won the Vote” is chock full of resources, information, updates and recommendations about the importance of planning for 2020, the national suffrage centennial in the US. It is published by the National Womens History Project.

SuffrageCentennials.com has been publishing since 2013.

 

“Votes for Women” Gazette is on the stands!

The next edition, or also known as the Gazette, edition of “How Women Won the Vote” is now on the stands from the National Women’s History Project. It functions as a Call to Action for individuals and institutions at the local, state and national levels to honor the 100th anniversary of the enfranchisement of American women in 2020.

THIS IS GREAT TO HAND OUT FOR AUGUST 26TH CELEBRATIONS on Women’s Equality Day.

Entertaining and lavishly illustrated, the Gazette documents the victories, defeats, personalities, and strategies used by state suffragists in their relentless effort to secure the basic right of citizenship for women. An excellent resource for Women’s Equality Day celebrations and for classrooms and events throughout the year. 25 copies for $10 (for orders placed before June 30th after that the cost is 25 for $15. Pre-orders need to be placed before June 30, 2018. Contact the National Women’s History Project. —nwhp.org

The Tale of the Fourth of July Co-conspirators for your suffrage centennial event!

Declaration_

Gather your friends around and help them picture the scene. Susan B. Anthony is ready to move in with Matilda Joslyn Gage, Sara Andrews Spencer, Lillie Devereau Blake, and Phoebe W. Couzins to crash the July 4th, 1876 centennial event in Philadelphia. The platform is filled with dignitaries and the co-conspirators wait until after the reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Here is what happened: Anthony marched up to the platform filled with centennial officials. She formally presented the Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States, an update on the declaration from back in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York.

The document sent the message that the nation must not turn its back on the unfinished American Revolution by denying women equality and the right to vote.

After delivering the proclamation, Anthony and others distributed copies to the crowd and left the centennial hall. THE RESULT: Pandemonium. General Howley, chairman, shouted for order to be restored.

THE OUTCOME: Suffrage activists held their own independence celebration in Philadelphia.

HOLD YOUR OWN CELEBRATION THIS YEAR AS YOU PLAN FOR THE 2020 NATIONAL CENTENNIAL OBSERVATION OF VOTES FOR WOMEN.

IN 2020, AMERICAN WOMEN WILL HAVE BEEN VOTING FOR 100 YEARS.

The July 4th Co-conspirators

AUDIO ACCOUNT OF WHAT HAPPENED on July 4, 1876 at the Fourth of July national centennial, as told by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in her memoir, Eighty Years and More. Read by Amelia Bowen for Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

NOW, LET’S FIRE UP THE BARBEQUE GRILL in 2018 and have fun!
Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow Suffrage Centennials on our Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event.

We honor Louise Slaughter! More suffrage centennial news!

Special Report: Thank you, Louise Slaughter (1929-2018) for your work benefitting American women! on Vimeo

.IN OTHER NEWS: The website—2020Centennial.org—is adding to the resources associated with 2020. You can add the 2020 centennial logo onto your site. The May issue of the Suffrage2020 listserv has some up-to-date and breaking news. Are you subscribed? Sampling of some of the listings:

The “One Woman, One Vote” Film Festival scheduled for March 2020 in Washington, DC.

The database (online) for Women and Social Movements is compiling a biographical dictionary of this first wave of the women’s rights movement. WASM is a subscription website, although the biographical dictionary portion will be made available on September 2018.

There is activity around the 2020 votes for women centennial in Washington state, North Dakota, and Missouri. Paperback editions of “Alice Paul: Claiming Power” by J.D. Zahniser (Oxford, 2014-2019) and “Remembering the Ladies: Celebrating Those who Fought for Freedom at the Ballot Box”by Angela P. Dodson (Center Street, 2017/2019)._

Post to Suffrage2020 by sending an email with your message to Suffrage2020@thezahnisers.com.

 

 

Only one more state to go for ERA: Plan now for August 26th, Women’s Equality Day!

Suffrage activist Rosalie Jones and Edna Kearns, left, on their way hiking in the direction of Albany, NY to see the governor about voting rights, 1914.

BREAKING NEWS: The state of Illinois passed the Equal Rights Amendment which means there is one state to go before the ERA is added to the U.S. Constitution. Here’s the list. Send emails and make phone calls!

Democratic Representative Lou Lang, who worked for this for over 20 years—- Langli@ilga.gov (217) 782-1252

Republican Representative Steven Andersson who helped get his Republican colleagues on board —-
steve@staterep65.com (217) 782-5457

Democratic Rep. Anthony DeLuca —– repdeluca@sbcglobal.net (217)782-1719

Republican Rep. Robert Pritchard —- bob@pritchardstaterep.com (217) 782-0425

Republican Rep. Christine Winger —- winger@ilhousegop.org (217) 7824014

Knuckle down and put on your thinking cap. There’s a buzz going on from now through 2020. And 2020 is an election year. Don’t forget to put suffrage centennial events and celebrations on your “to do” list.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow Suffrage Centennials on our Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event.

Visit Woodstock, New York & find out about Charlotte Perkins Gilman!

Woodstock, New York has women’s suffrage ties! on Vimeo.

Find out the real story about Charlotte Perkins Gilman and her role in the founding of the Woodstock art colony at the turn of the 20th century.

Article by Marguerite Kearns: “Charlotte Perkins Gilman: a Woodstock founding mother” on HudsonValleyOne.

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow SuffrageCentennials.com on our Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Keep up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event in 2020. Remember Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr from now through 2020 (InezMilholland.wordpress.com). And support the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial.

Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr, honored during 2018 through 2020!!

Inez Milholland on Parade during 2020!  on Vimeo.

Suffrage Centennials was a partner in the 2016 commemoration of Inez Milholland’s death in 1916. We continue to honor her during 2018 and spread the word to schools, organizations, individuals, and special interest groups. We stay current with news about Inez through her centennial blog:

InezMilholland.wordpress.com

Suffrage CentennialsimagesFollow Suffrage Centennials on our Facebook page, Twitter, email subscription, and the Quarterly Newsletter. Sign up for email on this web page. Stay up to date with postings, audio podcasts, and videos. Plan for your suffrage centennial event.

Call for nominations—National Women’s History Project

The National Women’s History Project Theme for 2019 is:Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence

This year the National Women’s History Project honors women who have led efforts to end war, violence, and injustice and pioneered the use of nonviolence to change society.  These Honorees embraced the fact that the means determine the ends and so developed nonviolent methods to insure just and peaceful results.

For generations, women have resolved conflicts in their homes, schools, and communities. They have rejected violence as counterproductive and stressed the need to restore respect, establish justice, and reduce the causes of conflict as the surest way to peace. From legal defense and public education to direct action and civil disobedience, women have expanded the American tradition of using inclusive, democratic and active means to reduce violence, achieve peace, and promote the common good.

From women’s rights and racial justice to disarmament and gun control, the drive for nonviolent change has been championed by visionary women. These women consciously built supportive, nonviolent alternatives and loving communities as well as advocating change. They have given voice to the unrepresented and hope to victims of violence and those who dream of a peaceful world. Contact the National Women’s History Project for more information. nwhpnominations@gmail.com by May 31, 2018.

Make sure you, your friends, schools and organizations are planning for 2020 when U.S. women will have been voting for 100 years. Visit the centennial blog for Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr. The National Women’s History Project sponsored a year-long observance of the 100 years since Milholland’s death in 1916. Help remember Inez during 2020.

Reminder about New York Museum exhibit closing soon!

May 13, 2018 is the closing of the “Votes for Women”exhibit at the New York State Museum in Albany, New York. It will be your last chance to see the wagon on exhibit for now anyway. And the suffrage exhibit is terrific. For more information about the wagon: SuffrageWagon.org

Also, keep in mind that the honoring of Inez Milholland, the U.S. suffrage martyr, continues with her centennial blog: InezMilholland.wordpress.com  Her centennial web site: InezMilhollandCentennial.com 

SuffrageCentennials.com continues publishing. Link up with us as the 2020 national suffrage centennial approaches in 2020. Follow by email, Twitter, and Facebook.